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Learning Communities

Your Community of Learning Begins…

Learning Communities Spring 2019

A core element of the Flagler College First Year Experience, Learning Communities are clusters of courses designed around a particular theme, cultural issue, or topic. Typically satisfying general education requirements for first year students, these interdisciplinary classes are deliberately designed to connect you with our finest faculty and to provide you with a learning environment that is both challenging and supportive.

Be on the look out for our Spring 2019 list of Learning Communities. 

Learning Communities

LC 1 A Meaningful Minority? The Politics of Identity

NOTE: This Learning Community is for Honors Program Students Only. This Learning Community will focus on the politics of identity in the United States over the past century. Beginning in the contemporary era, we will focus on issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and immigration, examining movements such as Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, ANTIFA, and white supremacist groups. As we move back through time, emphasis will be given to the origins, evolution, and achievements of social movements among African-Americans, Hispanics, women, Native Americans, and the LBGT community. The last part of the course will focus on immigration in the United States from historical, political, economic and social perspectives.

POS221 – Politics in the US – Rachel Cremona – MWF 10:00

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Wes King – MWF 9:00

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LC 2 Ain't That Just Like a Woman

NOTE: This Learning Community is for Honors Program Students Only. This Learning Community is designed to provide an introduction to some of the gender issues that affect each of us personally, socially, culturally, economically, and politically. We will explore the origins of our current views of gender, consider gender as a social construct, and learn about feminism and feminist analysis, its history and its current status. We will also look at the ways that gender influences families, work, law, popular culture, and self-image.  We will work from the inside out, from private concerns to public issues. We will move from personal writing and reflection to research, argument, and analysis. To do this, we will study diverse texts, such as literature, film, advertising, and social media as well as feminist scholarship. This Learning Community will also seek to place our academic exploration within a real-world context through guest speakers, volunteer opportunities, and field trips.

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Alex Asbille – TR 2:00

WMS101 – Intro to Women’s Studies – MW 2:00

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LC 3 Through Our Stories We Create Our History

Students will examine the various figures of the first half of American history, their distinctive personalities and characteristics. Dramatic portrayals of historical characters will be featured in a final presentation.

HIS206 – US History Post-1877 – Steve Voguit – TR 11:00

THA105 – Acting for the Non-Major – Christine Fogarty – TR 2:00

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LC 4 Justice and Religion

Is dialogue and agreement between religions essential to world peace?  Catholic Theologian Hans Küng once offered this formula:  “No peace among the nations without peace among religions.  No peace among the religions without dialogue between the religions.  No dialogue between the religions without investigation of the foundations of the religions.” (Islam, Past, Present and Future, xiii) How essential is religious dialogue and agreement to world peace?  Can the United Nations Universal Declaration on Human rights help?  Can it suffice?  What are some key issues to resolve in the realm of justice and religion?

INT200 – Buzz Brookman – MWF 8:00

REL111 – World Religion – James Rowell – MWF 9:00

 

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LC 5 Political Insiders and Outsiders

This course will provide an introduction to the field of political science enhanced by world literature readings that explore power and influence, winners and losers. We will consider themes of authority, conflict, freedom, citizenship, and revolution across a variety of eras and locations. Literature selections will include readings from relevant fiction, poetry, and essays.

POS200 –Intro to Political Science – Jill Dawson – TR 9:30

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Jeff Cryan – TR 8:00



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LC 6 Political Insiders and Outsiders

This course will provide an introduction to the field of political science enhanced by world literature readings that explore power and influence, winners and losers. We will consider themes of authority, conflict, freedom, citizenship, and revolution across a variety of eras and locations. Literature selections will include readings from relevant fiction, poetry, and essays.

POS200 –Intro to Political Science – Jill Dawson – MWF 8:00

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Jeff Cryan – TR 11:00

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LC 7 High Water Rising: Science, Literature, and the Environment

In this Learning Community, students will explore the dynamic relationship between humanity and the natural world from several disciplinary perspectives, with special attention to the rising tide of environmental crisis.  Along the way, students will be introduced to a variety of environmental topics (e.g., ecosystems and biodiversity; human population growth; land utilization; water quality, use, and management; energy cycles and flow; energy consumption and alternatives; sustainability; and climate change, etc.), conduct their own field research and gather data, read selections from classic works of environmental literature (by authors such as Thoreau, John Muir, Rachel Carson, Edward Abbey, Gary Snyder, Wendell Berry, Annie Dillard, Terry Tempest Williams, et al.), and hone their academic writing skills.

ENG242 – Selected Topics (Environmental Literature) – Hadley Mozer – TR 12:30

NAS107 – Environmental Science – Ben Atkinson – MF 11:00-11:50/w 10:00-11:50

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LC 8 The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games: In this learning community we will explore Panem and its people from the point of view of Philosophy and Literature. We will ask questions such as: Could anything justify a dictatorship like Panem? When is revolution justified? Is Peeta the same person before and after he has been hijacked (and what is a person, anyway?)  We will also discuss The Hunger Games as a work of literature and compare it to other works.  Special attention will be devoted to Pacific Rim literature, literature coming from a particular place, expressing an attitude both uncertain and bold.

PHI103 – Intro to Philosophy – Doug Keaton – MWF 11:00

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Tamara Wilson-  MWF 10:00

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LC 9 Words and Music: Writing About Music

These courses have the common goal of exploring the aesthetic appreciation of music as well as how to convey to others the emotions music evokes in us, the ideas it conveys to us, and the pleasure it gives us. To convey their understanding of both music and writing, students will draw on what they have learned about the appreciation of music and proper writing techniques to discuss aspects of this art form.  Possible topics include why some music stands the test of time, how music enriches our lives, or what qualities make a piece of music move us emotionally.  Music from the East as well as the Western canon in various genres, i.e. jazz, classical, musicals and rock will be explored.  We intend to learn and demonstrate what writers and musicians can communicate with their audience about human expression.

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Kevin Murphy – TR 3:30

MUS101 – Music Appreciation – JoAnne Maffia – TR 2:00

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LC 10 Words and Music: Writing About Music

These courses have the common goal of exploring the aesthetic appreciation of music as well as how to convey to others the emotions music evokes in us, the ideas it conveys to us, and the pleasure it gives us. To convey their understanding of both music and writing, students will draw on what they have learned about the appreciation of music and proper writing techniques to discuss aspects of this art form.  Possible topics include why some music stands the test of time, how music enriches our lives, or what qualities make a piece of music move us emotionally.  Music from the East as well as the Western canon in various genres, i.e. jazz, classical, musicals and rock will be explored.  We intend to learn and demonstrate what writers and musicians can communicate with their audience about human expression.

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Kevin Murphy – TR 9:30

MUS101 – Music Appreciation – Joe Colsant – MWF 11:00

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LC 11 The Nature of Nature: Biology, Religion, and Technology

How does our knowledge of the natural world around us cohere with our experience of spiritual realities? Are science and religion necessarily competing forms of knowledge and experience of the world? How does our knowledge of the natural world inform our religious systems of belief and practices and vice versa? How do these contribute to our process of decision making on pressing matters with practical and ethical dimensions, such as those presented by advances in biotechnology?

REL111 – World Religion – Jennifer Thweatt-Shelton – TR 2:00

NAS111 – Intro to Biological Science – Ed McGinley - MWF 10:00-10:50/T 9:30-12:15

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LC 12 Analyzing America

In this community, students will approach a variety of global issues, themes, and problems through interdisciplinary readings, discussions, and analysis, including quantitative reasoning and comparison. Using the United States as a baseline for comparison, we will quantitatively evaluate a variety of global issues, and examine how the US performs against the rest of the world.

INT200 – Intro to International Studies – Jill Dawson – TR 5:00

MAT223 – Statistics – Kurt Sebastian – TR 11:00

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LC 13 Performing Justice

This learning community will examine how complicated legal and ethical issues manifest themselves both in the courtroom and on the stage. We will read trial transcripts, case law, the Constitution, articles, and plays about issues such as abortion, sexual harassment, discrimination, capital punishment, and hate crimes and create original theater inspired by these readings.

LAW355 – American Constitutional Issues – Chris Moser – MWF 11:00

THA140 – Applied Theater – Leah Page – TR 9:30

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LC 14 History & Hollywood

The major events from American history have often been reflected in Hollywood movies, from the early silent films to the powerful movies of the turbulent 1960s. This Learning Community will explore serious U.S. history since 1877 and compare and contrast that with the celluloid versions that the public saw on the screen.

HIS206 – US History Since 1877 – Roger Mellen – MW 3:30

FLM/THA209 – History of American Film I – Thomas Hischak – MW 5:00

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LC 15 Acting Truthfully in Public Speaking

In a diverse world, how we communicate is of utmost importance. This Learning Community will explore how public speaking and acting are genuine, authentic encounters between human beings.

COM101 – Speech Communication – Sandra Gehring – TR 9:30

THA105 – Acting for the Non-Major – Christine Fogarty – TR 12:30

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LC 16 Acting Truthfully in Public Speaking

In a diverse world, how we communicate is of utmost importance. This Learning Community will explore how public speaking and acting are genuine, authentic encounters between human beings.

COM101 – Speech Communication – Sandra Gehring – TR 11:00

THA105 – Acting for the Non-Major – Christine Fogarty – TR 9:30

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LC 17 Art in the Age of Social Media

What is authenticity? How is identity mis/treated in museums? In what ways are global politics as apparent in today’s blockbuster as yesterday’s mural? Covering the history of art from the Renaissance through the modern period, and learning key concepts for the analysis of all visual objects, this Learning Community takes the long view on how art can make us more informed and critical viewers in an era when images and screens are ubiquitous.

ART218 – Visual Culture – Chris Balaschak – MWF 10:00

ART252 – Art History II – Jennifer Saracino – MWF 9:00

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LC 18 Art in the Age of Social Media

What is authenticity? How is identity mis/treated in museums? In what ways are global politics as apparent in today’s blockbuster as yesterday’s mural? Covering the history of art from the Renaissance through the modern period, and learning key concepts for the analysis of all visual objects, this Learning Community takes the long view on how art can make us more informed and critical viewers in an era when images and screens are ubiquitous.

ART218 – Visual Culture – Chris Balaschak – MWF 12:00

ART252 – Art History II – Jennifer Saracino – MWF 11:00

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LC 19 Writing on the Mind

This pairing of Introduction to Literature with Introduction to Psychology will explore the connection between the act of writing and mental health. As an established form of therapy, writing—specifically, journaling—has been shown to have numerous benefits for not only the professional writer and artist but for the average person. Students will be introduced to journal excerpts of some well-known authors, poets, and other artists and historical figures, and conduct a course of their own self-expression through the keeping of a journal, and study the psychological advantages of the practice, in hopes of not only cultivating creativity, but developing a lifelong, healthy, and rewarding pastime.

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Lauren Tivey – MWF 8:00

PSY101 – Intro to Psychology – Tracy Litzinger – MWF 9:00

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LC 20 Writing on the Mind

This pairing of Introduction to Literature with Introduction to Psychology will explore the connection between the act of writing and mental health. As an established form of therapy, writing—specifically, journaling—has been shown to have numerous benefits for not only the professional writer and artist but for the average person. Students will be introduced to journal excerpts of some well-known authors, poets, and other artists and historical figures, and conduct a course of their own self-expression through the keeping of a journal, and study the psychological advantages of the practice, in hopes of not only cultivating creativity, but developing a lifelong, healthy, and rewarding pastime.

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Lauren Tivey – MWF 9:00

PSY101 – Intro to Psychology – Tracy Litzinger – MWF 11:00

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LC 21 The Final Frontier: The Literature and Philosophy of Science Fiction

Explore space, cyberspace, and parallel universes through the lens of science fiction! This course will dive deep into the philosophical questions posed by popular stories and films from Frankenstein to Neuromancer to Interstellar in order to refine our critical thinking and writing. As we encounter aliens, cyborgs, and monsters, we will question and redefine what makes us human in a changing universe.

PHI103 – Intro to Philosophy – Jennifer Thweatt-Shelton – MWF 9:00

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Brianna Frentzko – MWF 11:00

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LC 22 The Final Frontier: The Literature and Philosophy of Science Fiction

Explore space, cyberspace, and parallel universes through the lens of science fiction! This course will dive deep into the philosophical questions posed by popular stories and films from Frankenstein to Neuromancer to Interstellar in order to refine our critical thinking and writing. As we encounter aliens, cyborgs, and monsters, we will question and redefine what makes us human in a changing universe.

PHI103 – Intro to Philosophy – Jennifer Thweatt-Shelton – MWF 11:00

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Brianna Frentzko – MWF 12:00

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LC 23 Western Civilization in Literature and Film

This Learning Community combines two foundational classes from separate but complementary disciplines — Literary Studies (Intro to Lit), and History (Western Civ II).  As such, it gives students an opportunity to study key developments in modern western history — from the 16th century to the present — through the ways in which literature and film have navigated the concerns surrounding those developments.  We will also think about how the past and its concerns have remained relevant to the present by looking at how older literature and history gets recycled, and rethought, in contemporary film.  The combination of disciplinary approaches around a common theme will give students a deeper and more resonant understanding of the development of Western civilization, as well as an introduction to how each discipline approaches its subject manner in its own ways.  Furthermore, students will develop a greater appreciation for how western culture has shaped and been shaped by, other civilizations — including the West’s own shifting and complex projection of the “East” and the “Other.”

HIS102 – Western Civilization II – Wayne Riggs – MWF 1:00

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Craig Woelfel – TR 9:30

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LC 24 God & Humans

How does humanity intersect with the divine?  Using sacred texts from world religions along with literature from authors dead and living, male and female, this learning community will explore the world's religions and the influence that they have had on works of literature from different cultures.

REL111 – World Religion – Bruce Flickinger – MWF 10:00

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Scott Benyacko – MW 5:00

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LC 25 Visuality and Literature: An Interdisciplinary History of Word and Image

The pairing of Intro to Literature and Visual Culture is an introduction to the history of expression via the media of word and image, i.e. literary genres and the visual arts.  Not only will we evaluate specific works of art, traditional forms of image making, graphic arts and genres of literature; this course will outline the paradigms and philosophies that underscore and illuminate those works.  Taken together, we will critique instances in which words and images have expressed common philosophical and aesthetic positions throughout the modern and post-modern eras.  Throughout the course, a focus is placed on cultivating an informed and critically engaged viewer/reader in order to empower and enrich our experience of visual arts and literary genres. As a result, we will nurture a deeper appreciation of literary genre and visual literacy, using both fields of study to inform and complement one another.

ENG202 – Intro to Literature – Greg Ruggiero – MWF 12:00

ART218 – Visual Culture – Nathan Lewis – TR 3:30

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LC 26 Modern American History through the Lens of Major Speeches

This learning community will enable students to trace the evolution of the United States since the Civil War through the examination and analysis of major speeches.  Students will understand the context of the speeches and their significance in American history.  They will be able to write and deliver their own informed speeches about the importance of those addresses and learn the rhetorical devices that helped make the historical speech powerful and memorable. They will also be able to argue their viewpoint about why certain historical speeches were stronger than others.

COM101 – Speech Communication – Don Aycock – TR 2:00

HIS206 – US History Post-1877 – Alex Cummins – MWF 1:00

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LC 27 Cultural Crosscurrents of Colonial Latin American History

This course will review the intersection of Latin American History and Culture.  Lectures will examine the events of Latin American history through the lens of normal human and Latin American cultural behaviors

HIS201 – Intro to Latin America from Pre-Contact to Independence – Jeffrey Jore – TR 8:00am

ANT201 – Cultural Anthropology – Howard Weizmann – TR 9:30

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Contact Us

Jill Dawson | Director of the First Year Experience Program and Co-Curricular Coordinator

FirstYear@Flagler.edu