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Flagler Core Courses

Fall 2022

Take a look at the courses below and talk to your CACE advisor about which classes work best for your goals. 

 

Academic Writing

Writing, Rhetoric, and Citizenship in the Age of the Culture Wars

Catalog Number: COR 101

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Hadley Mozer

Description: America is a deeply divided country, immersed in a conflict that has been given the moniker (though not without some controversy), "The Culture Wars"," a decades-long series of ideological skirmishes between progressives and conservatives," on topics ranging from abortion and gun control to LGBTQ rights, border walls, Confederate memorials, cultural appropriation, microaggressions, trigger warnings, and safe spaces, "that shows no signs of abatement. In this course, we will write a series of evidence-based argumentative papers on some of the controversial issues that divide us as a country, but as we do so we will strive to cultivate rhetoric that is the vehicle for productive dialogue, that refrains from demonizing the Other, and that contributes to the health of the nation to which we all belong. As we do so, we will practice the steps of the writing process (i.e., pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing); hone our skills in academic, or evidence-based, argument (asserting a thesis, making sub-claims, offering evidence); learn the basic principles of research (finding and evaluating sources) and documentation (using parenthetical references and assembling a Works Cited), and gain additional proficiency in the grammatical and mechanical conventions of Standard American English.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Writing and Citizenship with Integrity

Catalog Number: COR 101

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Various

Description: COR 101 focuses on both college-level academic writing and on the value and importance of practicing citizenship with integrity. Readings and essay assignments will focus on the knowledge, skills, virtues, and values necessary for sustaining polity, i.e., communities based on shared governance, whether the community in question be local, regional, national, international, global, or some combination thereof. Readings may also explore the challenges faced by those who are on the periphery of various polities, being bound by the rules, regulations, and/or laws governing the community, but not necessarily enjoying all of the rights, freedoms, and privileges to which others have access.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Writing and Reckoning with the Past

Catalog Number: COR 102

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Andrew Dicus

Description: The past is everywhere: on the lips of pundits and politicians, between the lines of your new favorite novel, and on plaques bolted to the buildings you walk past on your way to campus. And yet, even as history makes its way into more corners of our lives, it seems more elusive than ever: six different outlets might tell the same historical story in six different ways. As such, this class will engage with the idea of thoughtful and ethical stewardship of history. We will explore representations of historical people and events in a variety of rhetorical and literary genres, possibly including speeches, novels, poems, news reports, essays, and film. We will look at both primary and secondary sources, and we will use critical reading, thinking, and writing to research and reflect on the past and its long reach into the present. Ultimately, our goal is to develop writing and storytelling practices (including in both creative and more traditionally academic genres) that will help to cultivate a more ethical and honest reckoning with the past.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Writing and Thoughtful Stewardship

Catalog Number: COR 102

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Various

Description: COR 102 focuses on both college-level academic writing and on the value and importance of practicing thoughtful stewardship. Many of the readings, discussions, and writing assignments in this course will help you come to terms with the meaning of the term “thoughtful stewardship” and how the creation, preservation, and transformation of our shared worlds is the way in which we make, and keep, a community and a world worth living in. In this class we will learn how the power of writing is central to the human project of being thoughtful stewards.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Writing to Understand: Violence, Poverty and Overcoming in the Deep South

Catalog Number: COR 103

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Kimberly Bradley

Description: Poet Ellen Glasgow coined the term Southern Gothic to describe the "aimless violence," and "fantastic nightmares" of the works of some southern writers. Yet, it is with these tools that authors explore social issues from poverty and racism to mental illness and isolationism. We'll examine these topics through the work of contemporary fiction and creative nonfiction authors including Dorothy Allison, Harry Crews, and Zora Neale Hurston.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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What is English?

Catalog Number: COR 103

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Mimi Ensley

Description: This course asks students to question dominant ideas of linguistic "correctness" as they explore their own relationships with the English language. Thus, the course teaches the practices of "standard academic English" through a lens that explores the relationship between the "standard" and those systems of power that might devalue some speakers' and writers' versions of English. Through several written assignments — including a research-based essay and an autoethnographic narrative — students will both practice the skills and processes of academic writing and research. Simultaneously, they develop their own "critical language awareness," the knowledge that language is embedded in social and political contexts. Throughout, students will consider how this linguistic awareness might influence their own academic writing practices as well as their engagement with the broader community.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Writing and Respectful and Inclusive Community

Catalog Number: COR 103

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Various

Description: This section of COR 103 focuses on both college-level academic writing and on the value and importance of building respectful and inclusive communities. Many of the readings, discussions, and writing assignments in this course will help you come to terms with the meaning of the term “respectful and inclusive community” and will help you understand the roles and importance of curiosity, openness, and knowledge of cultural worldwide frameworks as we strive to build a world in which all individuals are respected and appreciated.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Honors: Race and Representation in Contemporary Film

Catalog Number: COR 103

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Wes King

Description: This is an academic writing course that focuses on race and representation in films from the last few decades. The films in the course explore racial difference, racial conflict, diversity, collaboration and understanding across racial communities. As an academic writing course, it will focus on preparing students for evidence-based written arguments.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 172; Writing Intensive)

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American Dreams/Immigrant Voices

Catalog Number: COR 104

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Alan Marcil

Description: In his seminal 1931 work, The Epic of America, James Truslow Adams defines the American Dream as, "that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is a difficult dream for the European upper classes to interpret adequately, and to many of us ourselves have grown weary and mistrustful of it. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and are recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position."

Immigration is the narrative of America. The United States is a land founded by immigrants who pursued and continue to pursue an idealized dream of inspired freedom. From the earliest tribes that left Asia and crossed the Bering Straits, to the forced immigration of slavery and the African Diaspora to the Cuban refugees, who floated to these shores on rafts, to the Asians who built the American railroads and continue to seek a new life in America and to the Central Americans who suffer their endless journey for freedom and a better life, The United States is, and continues to be, uniquely, a nation peopled by the continuous flow of transglobal immigration.

The American experiment is an ongoing and elastic process that absorbs and transforms multiethnic cultural transfusions to create an expansive national character. Today, this process has become increasingly controversial, yet who is to say who is, and who isn't and who can or cannot be an American? This course, through the analytical investigation of significant texts, will explore the American immigrant experience as heard in the literary voices of writers from specific American immigrant cultures.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Graphic Novels: Rhetoric and Poetics

Catalog Number: COR 104

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Samuel McMillan

Description: Once considered low-brow trash that degraded the minds of good children everywhere, the comic book is today undergoing something of a renaissance. Its influence on modern popular culture is practically inescapable. The Avengers, Suicide Squad, Sweet Tooth, Y: The Last Man, Black Widow, The Walking Dead, Black Panther, Preacher, The Boys—every time you turn on the TV or go to the movies you see the impact comics has had and continues to have on the ways we think about our art, our society, and ourselves. Not everyone is happy about this development, however. Martin Scorsese, for instance, has lamented the rise of the comic book as creating an atmosphere that is “brutal and inhospitable to art.” This class will examine the debate surrounding comics while learning more about the medium's history, influence, and craft as a means for developing the skills of argumentation, analysis, and written composition. We will begin by reading Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics to learn where graphic narratives came from and how to interpret both their form and content. From there we will apply our improved interpretive skills to a selection of today's best comics, such as Grant Morrison's All-Star Superman, Marjorie Liu's Monstress, Junji Ito's Uzumaki, and Brian K. Vaughn's Saga. Along the way you will undertake projects that allow you to practice evaluating and analyzing both popular and avant-garde works all while expressing those findings with clarity and grace. The semester will then close with your own comics creation, one that seeks to convey meaning and argument through the very medium we've been studying all along.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Writing and Transformative Learning

Catalog Number: COR 104

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Academic Writing

Instructor: Various

Description: COR 104, a course at the intersection of Academic Writing and Transformative Learning, will give students the opportunity to explore the critical role that writing can play in self-transformation. Essays earlier in the semester will call upon students to advance arguments about themselves and the trajectory of their own personal growth in genres such as the literacy narrative and the remembered event, while later essays will call upon students to advance arguments relying more heavily on textual analysis and/or other forms of evidence external to themselves on topics in which students are deeply invested and which have the potential to be personally transformative. Readings will be drawn from a wide range of writers whose work is exploratory of identity and the issues constituent thereof.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: ENG 152; Writing Intensive)

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Oral Communication

The Art of Speaking: Let the Verbal Gymnastics Begin

Catalog Number: COR 111

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Oral Communication

Instructor: Edward Koczergo

Description: This course will focus on "thinking on one's feet....then speaking." It will have an emphasis on Impromptu and Extemporaneous presentations, a focus on Debate, and feature speech preparation for other college courses. Proper grammar and critical thinking skills will be stressed as a means to essential communication. Put simply, students completing this course will exit saying, "I ain't afraid of no speech!"

(Gen Ed Substitute For: COM 101)

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No Experience Required - Speaking So That People Will Listen

Catalog Number: COR 111

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Oral Communication

Instructor: Sandra Gehring, Kathryn Catron

Description: In this course, the student will learn how to tailor messages to different audiences, connect authentically with their audience through their unique speaking styles, and create compelling oral presentations. This course approaches speech as an ethically charged activity practiced in civic and professional contexts. Specific objectives are to develop communication skills that invite transformation of both speaker and audience and to create discursive events where safety, value, freedom, and openness enable growth. As students learn to negotiate their place in the public space as speaker, audience member and/or engaged participant, they take responsibility for the on-going/evolving community discussion. The student is a part of that discussion, and this course intends to help students contribute to and take from that discussion.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: COM 101)

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Speaking for the Environment

Catalog Number: COR 112

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Oral Communication

Instructor: Don Aycock

Description: If we can't communicate clearly about the environment we certainly will never be able to fix it. Environmental issues affect us all, so effective oral communication about protecting the natural world is vitally important for tackling these challenges. Developing environmental awareness and sustainability skills, through informative and persuasive speaking is a priority in this course. Each voice can make a difference. Even if the student doesn't have access to public transportation, or can't afford solar panels, or can't bike to school, they can always use their voice. And having a more honest and open dialogue is a great first step toward bigger solutions. It's time to take the first step towards creating the will to act - by connecting with each other in oral communication. According to the EPA, “everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our natural environment. We must create and maintain the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony to support present and future generations.” It all begins with each of us. In this course, students will learn how to tailor messages to different audiences, people who agree with your views and people who do not, by connecting authentically with the audience through your unique speaking style, and creating compelling oral presentations.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: COM 101)

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Your Words, My Speech, Our World

Catalog Number: COR 112

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Oral Communication

Instructor: Andrea McCook

Description: This course approaches speech from the perspective of finding your voice through the words of others while exploring the concept of “thoughtful stewardship.” Thoughtful Stewardship means caring for things that we value in our communities. By embodying the words of others, you will develop rhetorical skills both written and oral, finding your own unique voice

(Gen Ed Substitute For: COM 101)

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Listening First: Music, Culture & Community

Catalog Number: COR 113

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Oral Communication

Instructor: Kristine Rome

Description: Dialogically music allows us to establish a unique cultural identity that is intrinsically experienced by both the individual and community in flux. The foundational learning of this course will be grounded in strategies of listening with the intent to overcome difference through dialogue, forwarding cultural music appreciation and advocacy all the while. When we listen first, we are communicating to understand difference without judgment which is a step toward empathy. From there, appreciation of matters such as art, aesthetics, experience, and worldview expand because of difference and not in spite of it. Such reversal of communication strategy, from speaking to listening, requires one to be open and curious to diverse perspectives and preferences. The oral communication assignments (2 individual informative, 2 individual persuasive, 1 group/team presentation) will be driven by the student's choice of different sub/cultural music themes/genres/artifacts/lyrics/history/and more. We will work as a class to reinterpret and synthesize performance, both by students' own oral presentations alongside analysis and critical response to historical and/or contemporary pop-cultural musical performances -- by listening first to provide greater meaning and significance to those experiences. The goal will be knowledge of a more ethically sound, empathy-based, communication method of civility by listening that can be applied across conversations of difference in diverse contexts including race, class, politics, religion and beyond.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: COM 101)

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Speaking to Impress

Catalog Number: COR 113

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Oral Communication

Instructor: James Della Penna

Description: This course will meet the Respectful and Inclusive Value Pathway in a number of ways. Success in the course will require the capacity to meaningfully engage others in context, and put their own understanding of culture at the core of transformative learning. By understanding ethical communication, the course will require regular analysis to compare and contrast their own communication and understanding with that of others, and adapt empathically and by developing skills in interviewing, (listening, understanding and responding) as well as creating and delivering individual and team presentations. The course also includes a requirement to work with others in a team setting to create and present cohesive work that reflects cooperation and understanding.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: COM 101)

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Essentials of Podcasting

Catalog Number: COR 114

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Oral Communication

Instructor: Tracey Eaton

Description: The number of podcast listeners in the U.S. is expected to hit 100 million in 2024, up sharply from 83 million in 2021. In this course, students will learn what makes a podcast successful as they interview people about issues and events on campus and in the community. Students will learn to capture clean audio, conduct interviews and write compelling scripts on their way to producing podcast episodes. They will also meet people of diverse backgrounds and views while gaining a new perspective on the power of podcasting to transform people's lives.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: COM 101)

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Natural Scientific Inquiry

Environmental Choices

Catalog Number: COR 121

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Natural Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Various

Description: Recent flooding highlights how St Augustine and its citizens face complex decisions in the coming days, decades, and years concerning how the city and the environment interact. Likewise, communities around the globe must make choices about how to cope with climate change, sea-level rise, pollution, growth, and conservation of resources. Scientific literacy is crucial to navigating the challenges of the 21st century. Scientific literacy requires foundational knowledge, experience in scientific inquiries, disciplined critical thinking skills, and an ability to discern the reliability of information sources. Scientific literacy must also be paired with clear and effective communication of data-based evidence, to improve our communities. In this course students will explore the need for scientific literacy and the responsibilities of scientists to provide sound data to inform decisions.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (B): Natural Scientific Inquiry)

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Environmental Sustainability

Catalog Number: COR 122

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Natural Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Various

Description: We depend on the earth's resources for everything. Yet human history is filled with societies that collapsed because of a lack of stewardship and lack of understanding of how natural systems functioned. In this course students will use lecture and laboratory activities to gain an understanding of how natural systems function, how humans influence them, and how humans can care for them. Additionally, students will be exposed to other reasons (aside from the benefit to humans) for people to care for the natural world.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (B): Natural Scientific Inquiry)

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Environmental Burdens

Catalog Number: COR 123

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Natural Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Various

Description: Environmental benefits and burdens result from human interaction with the natural world. Resources such as electricity, water, and food are products of nature, and the environmental also provides a place for the disposal of used water, trash, and hazardous waste. This course will investigate how the benefits and burdens of environmental interactions are created and managed. Environmental burdens are often not shared equitably among the members of a community. Climate Change, largely caused by the richest nations, will affect some of the poorest nations more severely. All over the world, disadvantaged people are on the front lines of environmental problems caused by landfills, power plants, traffic congestion, and sewers. With that lens, this course will use lecture and laboratory activities to investigate and understand environmental burdens and how their impact is distributed.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (B): Natural Scientific Inquiry)

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Environmental Investigations

Catalog Number: COR 124

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Natural Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Various

Description: Students will engage in the process of Environmental Science and learn about the natural world with their own eyes, not through words from a professor, textbook, or magazine article. Students will have the opportunity to conduct experiments, form opinions, and defend their conclusions. Lecture will provide background on the history of Environmental Science, the process of science, and other topics selected by the professor and students. Lab activities will incorporate inquiry-based investigations and give students the chance to formulate their own questions, design their own experiments, and answer their own questions. This class is designed to give science majors their initial exposure to undergraduate research.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (B): Natural Scientific Inquiry)

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Social Scientific Inquiry

The Body Never Forgets: Living with the Chronic Stress of Racism

Catalog Number: COR 131

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Social Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Jennifer Melvin

Description: How does racism get under our skin to create health disparities? In the U.S., African Americans of every social class experience higher rates of illness, infant mortality, disabilities, and a shorter lifespan than their white counterparts. In this course we will analyze the evidence-based sociological theory that Chronic Stressors are directly responsible for poor health outcomes for African Americans in every social class and at every stage of their lives. Students will learn how to find and use U.S. Census data on health outcomes by race and ethnicity and will analyze health trends over time and the social mechanisms that are correlated to poor health. Finally, students will find evidence-based research that compares the health of native-born African Americans and foreign-born African Americans to determine how quickly their health erodes upon immigrating to the United States and the social mechanisms that intersect to reproduce these poor health outcomes.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry; Writing Intensive)

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Perspectives on Alibis and Collaborators

Catalog Number: COR 133

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Social Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Josh Behl

Description: Miscarriages of justice may take many forms. One such form is the conviction of the innocent. Since 1992, the Innocence Project has helped exonerate 375 innocent individuals with the help of DNA evidence - including 21 who served time on death row. The wrongfully convicted are disproportionately black and lower income. The causes of these wrongful convictions vary to include eyewitness misidentifications, misapplied forensic science, false confessions, ineffective assistance of counsel, and paid jailhouse informants. However, one underlying cause of wrongful convictions has been present in every single case - a misbelieved or mistaken alibi. This course will be an in-depth look at the criminological, psychological, and legal issues present with this piece of potentially exculpatory evidence. Students will learn how to define, analyze, and evaluate research as it relates to alibis and corroborators. Also, students will be exposed to varying theoretical and applied approaches to the handling of alibi witnesses and evidence during the investigative, trial, and deliberations stages of a criminal prosecution.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry)

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Science of Learning

Catalog Number: COR 134

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Social Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Lauren Bates

Description: Academic success often entails managing and mastering multiple courses covering a variety of topics, each with their own unique requirements. Given these demands, the need to study and learn effectively is part-and-parcel of the life of any student. However, what methods entail studying effectively versus ineffectively? For example, is learning based on the amount of time a student spends studying? Is highlighting an effective method of learning? Is it better to study by reviewing notes or to test yourself? In this course, we are going to pose questions about studying and discuss the answers that have been uncovered through scientific research on human memory.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry)

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Media Uses and Effects

Catalog Number: COR 134

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Social Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Paige Chapman, Greenberry Taylor

Description: This course introduces students to the historical development and context of mass communication theories and concepts. They will develop their ability to understand and critique social scientific methods and perspectives to better understand persuasion, public opinion and the effects of media on audiences. Ultimately, students may become more thoughtful consumers of media who are able to make better use of the media they consume and create.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry)

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Psychology of Sleep

Catalog Number: COR 134

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Social Scientific Inquiry

Instructor: Tarah Raldris

Description: We know sleep is required for survival, and that we will spend about a third of our lives sleeping, but surprisingly, we still don't know why! These are just some of the many mysteries surrounding sleep. In this course, we will discuss the major theories surrounding sleeping (and dreaming). We will also examine how the society we live in may play a role in our sleep behaviors. We will explore questions such as: How do sleep beliefs and sleep habits differ across cultures? What is “hustle culture” and how might it influence our sleep health? How do social norms regarding sleep impact our own sleep behaviors? And ultimately, what can you do to improve your own sleep? This course will investigate these questions with the latest research on sleep, and you will even take a step back to study your own sleep beliefs and behaviors.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry)

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Quantitative Reasoning

Statistical Inquiry of Citizenship with Integrity

Catalog Number: COR 141

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Quantitative Reasoning

Instructor: Various

Description: We live in a world in which data drives decision-making. Data is everywhere! The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the statistical literacy required to cope with the practical demands of daily life in a way that encourages responsible citizenship in a modern democracy. Course objectives will emphasize critical thinking and problem solving, with the application of statistical skills to real-world scenarios requiring reasoning from evidence. Overall, this course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics. Topics include data organization; graphs and numerical measures; probability; normal, and sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; and regression.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: MAT 223)

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Statistical Inquiry of Thoughtful Stewardship

Catalog Number: COR 142

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Quantitative Reasoning

Instructor: Various

Description: Sustainability focuses on meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. The concept of sustainability is composed of three pillars: economic, environmental, and social; also known as profit, planet, and people. In this course, we will explore data that drives the decisions that support a more sustainable world. Course objectives will emphasize critical thinking and problem solving, with the application of statistical skills to real-world scenarios requiring reasoning from evidence. Overall, this course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics. Topics include data organization; graphs and numerical measures; probability; normal, and sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; and regression.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: MAT 223)

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Statistical Inquiry of a Respectful and Inclusive Community

Catalog Number: COR 143

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Quantitative Reasoning

Instructor: Various

Description: Diverse and inclusive workplaces earn deeper trust and more commitment from their employees. In this course, we will analyze data that explores the differences in people's views to gain an appreciation of these differences. Course objectives will emphasize critical thinking and problem solving, with the application of statistical skills to real-world scenarios requiring reasoning from evidence. Overall, this course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics. Topics include data organization; graphs and numerical measures; probability; normal, and sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; and regression.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: MAT 223)

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Transformative Learning Through Statistical Inquiry

Catalog Number: COR 144

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Quantitative Reasoning

Instructor: Various

Description: High-impact educational practices include but are not limited to undergraduate research, community-integrated education, internships, and study abroad. What does data tell us about these practices? In this course, we will be analyzing the data that lead institutions to foster the growth of these practices. Course objectives will emphasize critical thinking and problem solving, with the application of statistical skills to real-world scenarios requiring reasoning from evidence. Overall, this course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics. Topics include data organization; graphs and numerical measures; probability; normal, and sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; and regression.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: MAT 223)

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Creativity

Flagler College Chorale

Catalog Number: COR 152

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Creativity

Instructor: Kip Taisey

Description: The Flagler College Chorale is a non-auditioned mixed choir, which performs a wide variety of concerts and multi-cultural repertoire. The ensemble rehearses 3 hours/week and performs an accessible, yet challenging repertoire. This course will also focus on building fundamental aural and literacy skills. Students will analyze assigned repertoire in comparison to other ensemble‚ performances of the same arrangements/compositions, thus articulating the musical nuances that exist from one ensemble to the next, creating an understanding of what makes a unique performance. As an ensemble, students will create an original approach to an existing arrangement through analytical choices, making it unique to them. This course will culminate in a public performance, and written analysis of a specific arrangement prepared and performed by the ensemble.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Creative Expression (A): Creative Aesthetics)

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Dance: The Mirror of Society

Catalog Number: COR 153

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Creativity

Instructor: Elaina Wahl-Temple

Description: In this course students will learn the basic techniques of ballet, modern dance, musical theatre/jazz, and contemporary/hip hop dance. Each discipline will be viewed through a historical lens, concentrating on the social and political climate of the time and the consequent effects on these disciplines. Through ballet we will see an elitist form of dance move from renaissance Italy to prerevolutionary France and then be forced to Russia and England due to political uprisings. In modern dance we will explore the ideas of inclusivity of cultural dance technique, especially native American and far eastern influences as well as rebellion against elitism and the fight for sexual orientation acceptance. In jazz we will explore the contribution of marginalized groups to the creation of a specifically American form of music. We will explore South American and African dance along with the impact that segregation made on the Harlem Renaissance and its subsequent artistic contribution to 20th-century dance. Finally, we will look at contemporary dance as an amalgam of the previous three disciplines and ever-changing lines of social and cultural acceptance of these art forms.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Creative Expression (A): Creative Aesthetics)

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Beyond Beautiful: Photography as Critical Discourse

Catalog Number: COR 153

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Creativity

Instructor: Jason Schwab

Description: Photography can and should be more than an aesthetically captivating object. It can provide a unique access point to any and all challenging questions we find ourselves presented with. While it doesn't often provide answers, it does elicit self-reflection, critical analysis, and complex dialogue. In this class we will analyze important photographic works from the post-modern era to contemporary works that have facilitated critical dialogue on issues of racism, sexism, gender equality, and sexuality. We will examine the structures of power that have historically oppressed individuals and the visual techniques artists have utilized in response to these injustices. Students will then be given the opportunity to create unique works of art that respond to current injustices or systems of oppression they themselves experience, have experienced, or potentially perpetuate. This course will challenge students to critically examine themselves, analyze cultures outside of their own, develop an informed and compassionate understanding of diverse cultures and identities, and create photographic works of art that stimulate others to engage in this critical discourse.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Creative Expression (A): Creative Aesthetics)

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Theater for Social Justice

Catalog Number: COR 153

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Creativity

Instructor: Leah Page

Description: In this course, students will collaboratively create an original theatre piece connected to a social justice issue. To prepare for this culminating project, students will watch excerpts or full productions of scripted and devised theatre works rooted in social justice and will build specific skills in ensemble-based theatre making. Required readings and subsequent discussions around the chosen topic will inform the work. In mid-late October, students will begin devising their final piece. Devising involves generating material, providing critical feedback, editing and reshaping the material, and repeating this three-step process until the piece is ready to be rehearsed. Students will develop their critical eye by being actively involved in the feedback process.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Creative Expression (A): Creative Aesthetics)

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Make Something

Catalog Number: COR 154

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Creativity

Instructor: Nathan Lewis

Description: Students will be asked to create multiple objects, entities, and/or happenings in this course. Students will engage various media and numerous perspectives during the creation of such items. We will explore how objects, settings, and visual (aspects) have been endowed with meaning over time.

One does not simply create within a vacuum but becomes a part of more extensive ongoing dialogues and relationships within themselves, immediate surroundings, and even global theaters.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Creative Expression (A): Creative Aesthetics)

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Improv and Stereotypes

Catalog Number: COR 154

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Creativity

Instructor: Christine Fogarty

Description: The stories we portray in performance should mirror all of us in a complex and diverse way. Viola Spolin states: “Theatre Games are a process applicable to any field, discipline, or subject matter which creates a place where full participation, communication, and transformation can take place.” Students will explore the actors responsibilities in performance to mirror society in a complex and diverse way without stereotyping. This course closely explores gender and ethnic stereotypes through improvisation and in film that can perpetuate society’s dominant ideologies. Students will create a final acting project inspired in improvisation.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Creative Expression (A): Creative Aesthetics)

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Social & Cultural Inquiry

French Around the World

Catalog Number: COR 161

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Social & Cultural Inquiry

Instructor: Eugene Charoni

Description: French is a language widely spoken in 29 countries and by 275 million people. Despite the broader tendency to associate French and France, the numbers of French speakers speak for themselves and call for a deeper study of the French language and French-speaking world along with its unique cultural manifestations and social norms. The course starts with a historical overview of the French language, continues with the study of diverse cultural representations of the French-speaking world and concludes with the discussion about contemporary political, social, educational or cultural issues of several countries where French is spoken.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (B): Studies of Cultures)

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From Adam to the Apocalypse: Reading the Bible in America Today

Catalog Number: COR 163

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Social & Cultural Inquiry

Instructor: Timothy Johnson

Description: In 2007, Time Magazine wrote that the Bible. “has done more to shape literature, history, entertainment, and culture than any book ever written. Its influence on world history is unparalleled and shows no signs of abating.” No wonder then that the first book to come off of Johannes Guttenberg's press was the Bible and it remains the best-selling book ever and ubiquitous online. This book boldly claims to encompass the expanse of cosmic history, from the creation of the universe to its apocalyptic finale, thus providing a linear view of time that still permeates American culture. Despite the cultural forces it unleashes, the ethical questions it engages, the political perspectives it provides, and the religious imagination it inspired, few people have more than a fleeting knowledge of the Bible. This course entails a close reading of selected sections of the Bible, accompanied by a critical analysis of cultural forces that shaped them and their multiple interpretations today.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (B): Studies of Cultures; Writing Intensive)

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Women in Music

Catalog Number: COR 163

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Social & Cultural Inquiry

Instructor: Joanne Maffia

Description: Understanding how cultural and social norms, throughout history, have shaped women’s roles in music. We will dismantle myths and misconceptions that have told an incomplete story for centuries. We will listen to the work of women composers, songwriters and musicians from around the world and across historical timelines. I invite all students, no matter your gender identity, the opportunity to hear a wide variety of amazing music that has otherwise remained in the shadows.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (B): Studies of Cultures)

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World Religions

Catalog Number: COR 163

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Social & Cultural Inquiry

Instructor: Various

Description: World Religion studies cultures, beliefs, and traditions from a variety of religions such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrianism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism and  Sikhism, amongst others.  It considers both common and distinctive spiritual practices and beliefs. Students will learn each religion’s diagnoses of the fundamental problems of the human condition, what faith assumptions it has, and what it claims to offer to human beings.  It allows students to situate their belief in the larger family of world religions, and perspectives on them. Cultural sensitivity and awareness of comparative religious thinking are essential.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (B): Studies of Cultures)

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Disability and Society

Catalog Number: COR 164

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Social & Cultural Inquiry

Instructor: Cheryl McCarthy

Description: Chances are that each one of us will become temporarily or permanently disabled in our lifetime. In the U.S. alone, one out of every four individuals has some type of disability. What are the legal protections of persons with disabilities? How did our disturbing past treatment of the disabled transform into impactful legislation? What are the social perceptions of disability? What disparities currently exist among different groups such as gender, race, age and class? How is disability portrayed in pop culture? This course will delve into the stories of persons with disabilities and increase your awareness of national and international support organizations and movements. We will explore the social and physical barriers presented to persons with disabilities and disabilities rights advocates. Best practices and approaches in moving toward a more inclusive and accommodating society will be discussed.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (B): Studies of Cultures)

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Music Appreciation

Catalog Number: COR 164

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Social & Cultural Inquiry

Instructor: Various

Description: This course will serve as a basis to understand music from a multitude of perspectives: historical, cultural, social, economic and more, and to gain an awareness of how music is integrated into every aspect of our society. Unlike most other courses in music appreciation, Western art music will play a secondary/supporting role in this course curriculum, and the structure will not be shaped around traditional historical approaches.  This course will be more experiential, drawing upon epistemological and familiar approaches to passive listening driving students toward skills requiring more intentional listening practices. Students will explore other ways of musicking around the globe, looking both at traditional styles, as well as examining how other traditional styles of music are incorporated into the Western tradition and vice versa. There is potential for this course to culminate in a public performance of an original work that would be presented at each semester’s choral concert, which would qualify as a High Impact Practice.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (B): Studies of Cultures)

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Historical Inquiry

Migration: Global and Historical Perspectives

Catalog Number: COR 171

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Historical Inquiry

Instructor: Nicholas Miller

Description: Migration is one of the most hotly contested issues in contemporary politics. It is also an enduring feature of the history of humankind. In this course, you will gain global and historical perspectives on migration, addressing the long-term effects of environmental, economic, political, and socio-cultural causes as well as the influence of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary contexts. We will consider the spectrum of forced and free forms of migration, study the rise of the modern system of international migration control since 1880, and compare recent responses to the possibilities and challenges of migration in select contexts in Europe and Asia. Through a creative set of individual and collaborative assignments cultivating historical inquiry and global citizenship, this course gives you a forum to explore multiple migration stories, including your own.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (A): Western History; Writing Intensive)

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War and Peace

Catalog Number: COR 171

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Historical Inquiry

Instructor: Alex Cummins

Description: War plagued humankind over the centuries, increasing in intensity and scope over time. Modern warfare, beginning in Europe in the seventeenth century, accelerated the intensity and scope of warfare due to the advent of gunpowder and the rise of modern centralized monarchies. In the twentieth century, warfare encompassed the entire globe, increasing the death toll and devastation exponentially in greater proportion to that considered horrific in the seventeenth century. Why did political leaders resort to wars? Why did their populations support these wars? Were there any just wars? The wars ended with a peace treaty or agreement. Did these treaties resolve the issues which precipitated the wars? Were there any just treaties? In this course, students will answer these questions by examining six major wars as individual case studies. They will learn the context for each war and examine the various interpretations of each war through the use of primary and secondary sources. They will apply a similar method to an examination of peace treaties. They will see the consequences of each war. Students will learn the importance of cause-and-effect and of comparing and contrasting sources of information. They will also grapple with the ethical considerations of war and peace. They will demonstrate their knowledge and arguments in an essay written for each war. And they will participate in class discussions about the causes and end of each war as well as about the ethical considerations for each war. Students will consider whether wars can be prevented to avoid catastrophic losses in human life, infrastructure, and material resources.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (A): Western History)

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Treasures from Early Antiquity: Discovery, Interpretation, and Preservation

Catalog Number: COR 172

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Historical Inquiry

Instructor: Buzz Brookman

Description: This course explores the rise, impact, and legacy of the major ancient Near Eastern civilizations (Sumerians, Egyptians, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians). Material treasures such as tombs, temples, artifacts, and texts open the door to better understanding people from the earliest civilizations. Students become explorers and interpreters of the ancient world by considering the material culture from early antiquity as they build skills by investigating and interpreting the human past via artifacts and documents. Primary sources from antiquity are read and important archaeological discoveries are considered as the ancient past is surveyed with an eye towards interpreting how the past informs the present and the challenge of stewardship in preserving antiquities from the ancient world.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (A): Western History)

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Hollywood and History: When Real becomes Reel

Catalog Number: COR 172

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Historical Inquiry

Instructor: Roger Smith

Description: Hollywood has tackled some of the world's most controversial topics, celebrated leaders, and events of apocalyptic proportions. This course will analyze sixteen movies that deal with historical events concerning race, genocide, war, peace, greed, exploration, love, intrigue, and the human spirit. We will determine what Hollywood "got right" and the impact on historical interpretation when they "got it wrong." We will look at Hollywood's complicity in interpreting the historical narrative incorrectly and why. Perhaps more importantly, we will discuss the historical events and individuals that Hollywood has overlooked - many times intentionally - and why.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (A): Western History)

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St. Augustine in World History

Catalog Number: COR 173

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Historical Inquiry

Instructor: Various

Description: This course provides a highly experiential introduction to world history through the fascinating sites of St. Augustine. Focusing on themes of colonization, commerce, conquest, conversion, imperial rivalry, indigenous lives, labor migration, plantations, and slavery, students will engage with the multiple colonial histories of St. Augustine, enriching their understanding of the community that they have joined in coming to Flagler. This course combines integrated field trips and a role-playing element while offering an introduction to historical inquiry.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (A): Western History)

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Utopia and Dystopia in History, Literature, and Film

Catalog Number: COR 174

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Historical Inquiry

Instructor: John Young

Description: This course will examine various utopian ideas and utopian community experiments in their historical contexts, ranging from ancient through modern times. It will also examine the modern cynicism about utopia and the idea of dystopia as an outgrowth of that cynicism. In the process of this inquiry, students will be exposed to some of the foundational works of the western literary canon—e.g., Plato's Republic, Dante's Divine Comedy, Thomas More's Utopia, and George Orwell's 1984—as well as depictions of utopian/dystopian visions in film. We will attempt to understand these works as products of their specific historical contexts. Students will also research utopian movements in various historical periods and will reflect on the relative successes or failures of those movements. The central goal of the course is to achieve the kind of transformative learning that comes from diving deeply into both great literature and unfamiliar societies and cultures, as well as immersing oneself in research.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (A): Western History; Writing Intensive)

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History Detectives

Catalog Number: COR 174

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Historical Inquiry

Instructor: Jessica Howell, Alex Cummins

Description: This class is an experiment. The goal of this class is to spend the semester collectively exploring two opposing sides of a narrowly focused historical subject from beginning (asking thoughtful historical questions and gathering information) to end (presenting your research findings to an audience) in order to gain a better understanding of the methods and skills utilized in a rigorous historical process. The historical subject will vary depending on the instructor.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Foundations of Knowledge (A): Western History; Writing Intensive)

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Ethical Reasoning

Science and Religion

Catalog Number: COR 181

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Ethical Reasoning

Instructor: James Rowell

Description: To what extent are ethical ideas dependent upon religion? Has science been any threat to the ethical integrity or reasoning about religion? Traditionally religion was known as the 'Queen of the Sciences', before Galileo's day. There was a unity of theological perspectives in the Christian tradition satisfied to explain our world and its spiritual and ethical problems. With the advent of Galileo, Darwin, and modern scientific thinking up to Einstein's day, religion and science have now become as much potential adversaries as they were once partners. Does modern science force us to rethink religion, and therefore ethics? If so, in what ways? Will science overwhelm and supplant religion, and does this have consequences for moral reflection?

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry)

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How to Citizen

Catalog Number: COR 181

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Ethical Reasoning

Instructor: Lorna Bracewell

Description: “Democracy! Bah! When I hear that word I reach for my feather boa! Better we should have a big Jewish dictatorship full of Blintzes: Better a spade Fish queen...” – Allen Ginsberg As poet Allen Ginsburg observes here, even (especially?) in a democracy, politics can often feel absurd, ridiculous, and bewildering. The primary aim of this course is to make it feel a little less so by furnishing you with the intellectual resources necessary to navigate our contemporary political world. More specifically, this course will help students grapple with questions such as the following: What are the primary differences between Democrats and Republicans? What do people mean when they talk about the political “left” and the political “right”? Are all Democrats “liberals” and are all Republicans “conservatives” and what do these terms even mean anyway? Why are some conservatives so critical of Donald Trump and why are some liberals so critical of Bernie Sanders? Why do some lefties on Twitter insult other lefties on Twitter by calling them neoliberals? What is identity politics and why is everyone so uptight about it? What does the 2016 Republican Party Platform (there was no 2020 Republican Party Platform) mean when it says, “taxes, by their very nature, reduce a citizen’s freedom,” and what does the 2020 Democratic Party Platform mean when it says, “Democrats are committed to standing up to racism and bigotry in our laws, in our culture, in our politics, and in our society, and recognize that race-neutral policies are not sufficient to rectify race-based disparities”? Is Joe Biden a communist? Is Donald Trump a fascist? Why does the electoral college elect the president in the United States instead of the voters? Is America even a democracy at all? To help you answer these questions and many others, this course will examine the historical development and contemporary manifestation of a variety of political belief systems or “ideologies” that shape politics in the United States and beyond today. By exposing you to a wide range of ideological perspectives, the course will help you become a more informed and efficacious democratic citizen who understands what ideology (or ideologies) they believe in, why they believe what they do, and how best to defend their beliefs.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry; Writing Intensive)

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Living in a Digital World

Catalog Number: COR 181

Value Pathway: Citizenship with Integrity

Literacy: Ethical Reasoning

Instructor: Doug Keaton

Description: We live in a world ruled by algorithms – by computers and those who design them. Social media, artificial intelligence, commercial surveillance affect our lives every day. Soon there will be more, with everything from self-driving cars to “friend bots” for the elderly. Our task is to understand the implications of this fact for our society and our future. Will the objectivity of computers remove the worst of our human failings, or will it reproduce and amplify them? How does the power of technology affect the poor who have less access to it? What does artificial intelligence say about humanity as a whole? Are we ultimately just machines, ourselves? In this class we will think about technology from the human side, using philosophy and science, both.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry; Writing Intensive)

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Life on the Pale Blue Dot

Catalog Number: COR 182

Value Pathway: Thoughtful Stewardship

Literacy: Ethical Reasoning

Instructor: Brenda Kauffman

Description: This course will examine what it means to live responsibly on planet earth. It will consider what if any obligations or ethical considerations we might have to people and planet now and for future generations. What food can we ethically eat? Where should we get our clothes? Should we give up travelling by air to reduce carbon dioxide emissions? Should governments have relations with nations that consistently violate their people’s human rights? How can we have productive conversations about issues of environmental sustainability, animal rights, human rights, and economic inequality when there are conflicting ideas about them? In this class we will evaluate the arguments and debate the various theoretical approaches and identify the benefits and drawbacks of each.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry; Writing Intensive)

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More Than A Game: The Ethics of Sport

Catalog Number: COR 183

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Ethical Reasoning

Instructor: Kurt Sebastian

Description: Sport both reflects and shapes society. Further, sports can be a place to learn and display the loftiest virtues, but it can also encourage and reveal our worst faults. This course will address the complex concepts of right and wrong through the lens of sports. Early in the semester, students will learn some of the fundamental tools of ethical reasoning and different ethical approaches. Later, students will actively apply these tools to issues in sport, all while keeping in mind our goal of building a respectful and inclusive community. While differences of opinion will inevitably occur, students will learn how to debate their differences with facts and knowledge of various ethical approaches toward determining right and wrong. The course will explore questions such as the following. What is fair play and being a good sport? Are college athletes exploited? Are separate gender divisions justified? Is violence in sport acceptable? What forms of performance enhancers cross the line? And should we ban sports that harm players?

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry)

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Ethical Controversies

Catalog Number: COR 183

Value Pathway: Respectful and Inclusive Community

Literacy: Ethical Reasoning

Instructor: Justin Capes

Description: Do the ends justify the means? Is abortion immoral? Do animals have rights? Is the death penalty just? Are open borders a moral imperative? This course introduces students to moral philosophy through an examination of ethical controversies such as these. It is designed not only to inform students about the complex moral debates over these issues but also (and more importantly) to help them learn how to think carefully and critically about important ethical and social issues.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry; Writing Intensive)

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A Life Well Lived

Catalog Number: COR 184

Value Pathway: Transformative Learning

Literacy: Ethical Reasoning

Instructor: Justin Forbes

Description: Most people want to live life well. But what does a life well lived look like? What sorts of habits, activities, commitments, relationships, and experiences does it include? And what can we do to ensure that our lives have more of those things? In this course, we explore these questions through close reading and discussion of texts from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

(Gen Ed Substitute For: Ways of Knowing (A): Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry; Writing Intensive)

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