Skip Navigation
ponce hall
Background
Student Life
Connect with Flagler
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Instagram
Google+

Hurricane Preparedness Tips

Use the following guidelines to help you prepare for hurricane season (June 1-November 30) while attending Flagler College. 

What if a tropical storm or hurricane threatens St. Augustine? 

  • Flagler college will activate its Hurricane Plan and begin monitoring the storm.
  • You should monitor local and national media, as well as watch for College announcements.
  • Unless St. Augustine is evacuated, the college’s residence halls will remain open and the dining hall will continue to operate during designated hours.
  • If power is lost, a backup generator will continue to supply electricity to Ponce Hall and FEC.

How can I prepare now? 

Develop answers to these questions:
  • If you are asked to evacuate, where will you go?
  • What evacuation routes will you take?
  • If off-campus, do you live in an evacuation area or not?
  • What is your home’s vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind?
  • Do you have renter’s insurance?
  • Do you have pets? Does your plan include them?

How do I prepare? 

At home:
  • Non-Perishable Foods
  • Drinking Water for at least 3 days
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • Manual Can Opener
  • Flashlight/Batteries
  • Radio
  • Toiletries/Medications
  • First Aid Kit
  • Fill tub with water for sanitation
For the road:
  • Cash/Credit Cards
  • Important Documents
  • Fill your gas tank
  • Cell phone charger
  • Flashlight/Batteries
  • Radio
  • Blankets
  • Toiletries/Medications
  • First Aid Kit
  • Non-Perishable Foods
  • Drinking Water

When should I return to campus and when will classes resume? 

Do not return to campus until told to do so. The college will communicate when to return through official communication channels listed on back.

What if an evacuation is ordered in St. Augustine? 

  • St. Johns County Emergency Management officials will open designated shelters.
  • If possible, evacuate to the home of a friend or family member instead of a shelter.
  • Leave the area early to avoid congested roadways.
  • Students, faculty and staff will not be allowed to remain on campus.
  • Students who are leaving must sign out before leaving campus, and should notify family about plans.
  • While under evacuation, students, faculty and staff should not return to the college until told to do so.

Tropical Weather Basics

Tropical Cyclone Definitions

 
Tropical Depression - A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of less than 39 mph.
 
Tropical Storm - A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph.
 
Hurricane - A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 74 mph or higher.
 
Major Hurricane - A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds greater than 110 mph, corresponding to a Category 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.
 
Watches and Warnings
 
Hurricane Warning
A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the warning area. A warning is typically issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of
tropical-storm-force winds. The warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.
 
Hurricane Watch
A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the watch area. A watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
 
Tropical Storm Warning
A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.
 
Tropical Storm Watch
A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the watch area, generally within
48 hours.

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale  

Category 1: 74-95 MPH Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.
 
Category 2: 96-110 MPH Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.
 
Category 3: 111-129 MPH Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.
 
Category 4: 131-156 MPH Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.
 
Category 5: >156 MPH Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

More Information 

Visit these sites for more information about preparing for storms: 

Full version of our Hurricane Preparedness Tips