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Flagler College mourns loss of retired professor Andrew Dillon

November 6, 2015 10:28 AM
Andrew Dillon

Dr. Andrew Dillon, one of Flagler College’s earliest professors, passed away on Nov. 5 after a lengthy battle with cancer. The English professor joined the college’s faculty in 1972, where he inspired students with his lyrical wisdom and Shakespearian theatrics in the classroom.

Dillon was born in New York City in 1935, attended the Dalton School and earned his high school diploma from the Browning School. He continued his education at City College of New York and was awarded his master’s and doctoral degrees from New York University.

During his time at Flagler College, Dillon taught courses in Shakespeare, Milton, Chaucer and Renaissance Literature, and was twice recognized by the Flagler Student Government Association as Outstanding Teacher of the Year.

In addition to his keen interest in Shakespeare and other Renaissance authors, Dillon had a love for poetry and devoted much of his personal time to writing. He published more than 200 poems in literary journals, as well as numerous critical essays and book reviews in professional journals.

A book of Dillon’s poetry, “Vital Signs,” was published this summer by Flagler College. The collection, including many of the poems he penned in the last year while undergoing treatment for cancer, illuminates life’s wonders, victories, struggles and loss. It touches on a myriad of topics, from the virtues of teaching and the marvelous acrobatics of his grandchildren to his difficult fight against cancer. Proceeds from the book benefit the Andrew Dillon Scholarship, awarded each year to a student studying English at Flagler College. 

Dr. Dillon is survived by his wife of 48 years, Mary Jane Dillon; his daughter, Caroline; his son, Michael; his daughter-in-law, Melissa; and two grandchildren, Lucy and Owen. A memorial service will be held to celebrate his life at a later date.