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Writers-in-Residence

Flagler College Writers-in-Residence Fall 2016- Lectures

http://www.floridarts.org/other-words-conference/

Dan Albergotti

Dan Albergotti

Thursday, October 6, Flagler Room, Ponce Hall, 7 p.m.

Dan Albergotti is the author of The Boatloads (BOA Editions, 2008) and Millennial Teeth (Southern Illinois University Press, 2014), as well as a limited-edition chapbook, The Use of the World (Unicorn Press, 2013). His poems have appeared in The Cincinnati ReviewFive PointsThe Southern ReviewThe Virginia Quarterly Review, and two editions of the Pushcart Prize, as well as other journals and anthologies. A graduate of the MFA program at UNC Greensboro and former poetry editor of The Greensboro Review, Albergotti is a professor of English at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina.

 

Constantine Santas

Constantine Santas

Thursday, October 27, Gamache-Koger Theater, 6 p.m.

The Essential Humphrey Bogart
Includes a viewing of Casablanca
Constantine Santas

Constantine Santas earned his B.A. at Knox College, his M.A. at the University of Illinois at Urbana, and his Ph.D. in American Literature at Northwestern University. He taught at Milwaukee Downer College (1962-64), University of Illinois at Chicago (1964-1971), and served as Chairman of the English Department at Flagler College from 1971 to 2002, when he retired as Professor Emeritus. At Flagler College he initiated a program of Film Studies in 1987, which continues today.  Santas has published literary and film articles, and has authored translations of three ancient Greek plays, performed at the Flagler College Auditorium. He was a recipient of a Danforth Foundation Teacher Grant (1967-69), was included in Choice as an Outstanding National Teacher in 1983, in American Hellenic Who’s Who, 1990, and in Who’s Who Among American Teachers in 2002. His publications include, Aristotelis Valaoritis (Boston, Twayne Publishers, 1976), Responding to Film (Chicago: Burnham Publishers, 2002), The Epic in Film (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007), The Epics of David Lean (Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 2011). He is a co-author of The Encyclopedia of Epic Films (Lanham. Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), and his latest work is The Essential Humphrey Bogart, (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield), April 16, 2016. Currently he is under contract to complete a portrait of Ingrid Bergman and her films.

 

Rhonda Riley Donald Morrill

Thursday, November 3rd, 7:30 p.m. , Solarium, Ponce Hall

 

Donald Morrill is the author of three volumes of poetry, Awaiting Your Impossibilities (Florida Book Award, Silver Medal for Poetry), At the Bottom of the Sky and With Your Back to Half the Day, as well as four books of nonfiction. He has taught at Jilin University, Peoples’ Republic of China, and has been a Fulbright Lecturer at the University of Lodz, Poland, as well as the Bedell Visiting Writer in the Nonfiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa and Writer-in-residence at the Poetry Center at Smith. Currently he teaches in the Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Program at the University of Tampa and is Associate Dean of Graduate and Continuing Studies there.

 

Brandi George

Brandi George

Thursday, November 3rd, 7:30 p.m. , Solarium, Ponce Hall

 
Brandi George's first collection of poetry, Gog (Black Lawrence Press, 2015) won the gold medal in the 2015 Florida Book Awards. Her poems have appeared in such journals as Best New Poets 2010The Iowa ReviewGulf CoastColumbia Poetry ReviewNinth Letter, and Prairie Schooner, also winning first place in the Dana Awards and the Zone 3 Poetry Awards. Brandi has been awarded residencies at Hambidge Center for the Arts and the Hill House Institute for Sustainable Living, Art & Natural Design, and she attended the Sewanee Writer’s Conference as a Tennessee Williams Scholar. Brandi currently resides in Tallahassee, where she is a Ph.D. candidate at Florida State University.
 

Michelle Boisseau 

Michelle Boisseau

Friday, November 4th, 7:30 p.m., Solarium, Ponce Hall

 

Michelle Boisseau won the Tampa Review Prize for her fifth book of poems, Among the Gorgons, published by University of Tampa Press in 2016. Her A Sunday in God-Years, Arkansas 2009, in part examines her paternal ancestors’s slave-holding past in Virginia, into the 17th century. Trembling Air was a PEN USA finalist, University of Arkansas Press, 2003; she’s also published Understory, the Morse Prize, Northeastern University Press, 1996, and No Private Life, Vanderbilt, 1990.  Recent poems appear in Best American Poetry 2016Poetry DailyPoetryGettysburg ReviewYale Review, and Shenandoah. Her textbook, Writing Poems (Longman), is now in its 8th edition, with her colleague Hadara Bar-Nadav. Boisseau has twice been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. She teaches in the MFA program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City where she is Senior Editor of BkMk Press and Contributing Editor of New Letters.

 

Michael Martone

Michael Martone

Friday, November 4th, 7:30 p.m., Solarium, Ponce Hall

 
Michael Martone's most recent books are Winesburg, Indiana, Four for a Quarter, Not Normal, Illinois: Peculiar Fiction from the Flyover, Racing in Place: Collages, Fragments, Postcards, Ruins, a collection of essays, and Double-wide, his collected early stories. Michael Martone, a memoir in contributor’s notes, Unconventions: Writing on Writing, and Rules of Thumb, edited with Susan Neville, were all published recently. He is also the author of The Blue Guide to Indiana, published by FC2. The University of Georgia Press published his book of essays, The Flatness and Other Landscapes, winner of the AWP Award for Nonfiction, in 2000. With Robin Hemley, he edited Extreme Fiction.  With Lex Williford, he edited The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction and The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction.  Martone is the author of five other books of short fiction including Seeing Eye, Pensées: The Thoughts of Dan Quayle, Fort Wayne Is Seventh on Hitler's List, Safety Patrol, and Alive and Dead in Indiana.  He has edited two collections of essays about the Midwest: A Place of Sense: Essays in Search of the Midwest and Townships: Pieces of the Midwest.  His stories and essays have appeared in Harper's, Esquire, Story, Antaeus, North American Review, Benzene, Epoch, Denver Quarterly, Iowa Review, Third Coast, Shenandoah, Bomb, and other magazines.

Martone has won two Fellowships from the NEA and a grant from the Ingram Merrill Foundation.  His stories have won awards in the Italian Americana fiction contest, the Florida Review Short Story Contest, the Story magazine Short, Short Story Contest, the Margaret Jones Fiction Prize of Black Ice Magazine, and the first World's Best Short, Short Story Contest.  His stories and essays have appeared and been cited in the Pushcart Prize, The Best American Stories and The Best American Essays anthologies. Michael Martone is currently a Professor at the University of Alabama where he has been teaching since 1996.

 

Kevin Kehrwald

Kevin Kehrwald

Wednesday, November 16th, Solarium, Ponce Hall, 7 p.m.

Dr. Kevin Kehrwald, Director of the Film Studies Program at Frostburg State University and author of Prison Movies: Cinema Behind Bars, addresses how prison films have depicted lives behind bars and how these films have affected public discussion of justice and punishment and of social issues concerning penology and practice. Dr. Kehrwald will illustrate with short clips from relevant films dating from the early days of sound films to the present. A discussion follows the lecture. 

Kevin Kehrwald is author of Prison Movies: Cinema Behind Bars traces the public fascination with incarceration from the silent era to the present. Often considered an offshoot of the gangster film, the prison film precedes the gangster film and is in many ways its opposite. Rather than focusing on tragic figures heading for a fall, the prison film focuses on fallen characters seeking redemption. The gangster's perverse pursuit of the American dream is irrelevant to the prisoner for whom that dream has already failed. At their core, prison films are about self-preservation at the hands of oppressive authority. Like history itself, prison films display long stretches of idleness punctuated by eruptions of violence, dangerous moments that signify liberation and the potential for change.
Co-sponsored by The Golden Way: Films That Make A Difference

 

Other Words Conference, Florida Literary Arts Coalition- Events

Open Mic, Hosted by David Axelrod

Friday, November 4th, 9:30 p.m.

Solarium, Ponce Hall

 

Saturday, November 5th, 7:30 p.m.

2016 Flash Play Festival (directed by Carrie J. Cole)

Broad Comedy (directed by Tiffany Razzano)

Solarium, Ponce Hall

http://www.floridarts.org/other-words-conference/

In light of this year's conference theme, "Humor--The Art of Writing Funny," we're hosting a flash play festival (to test our conference attendees' funny-writing chops. Everyone presenting or attending the conference is not just invited but challenged to submit a flash play. If your flash play is chosen, we'll perform it the night of SATURDAY, 11/5 along with our BROAD COMEDY event (directed by Tiffany Razzano). 

Your challenge:                                                                                                                                  

Write a ten-minute play (roughly ten pages of dialogue) which MUST INCLUDE: 

- No more than THREE performers
- One of THREE specified props
- A SPECIFIC line of dialogue
 

The dialogue and props choices will be revealed on MONDAY, 10/3, when the submission window opens. 
Deadline for submission: MONDAY, 10/24

Questions about the flash play festival? Contact carriejcole@gmail.com with the subject line “Flash Play Festival.”

Flagler College Writers-in-Residence Spring 2017- Lectures

Maile Chapman 

Maile Chapman 

Thursday, February 23, location TBD, 7 p.m.

Maile Chapman is the author of the novel Your Presence Is Requested at Suvanto, short-listed for the Guardian First Book Award and a finalist for the PEN Center USA literary award in fiction. Her stories have appeared in A Public SpaceDublin Review, Fairy Tale Review, Best American Fantasy, and GRANTA Online, among others. She received her MFA in Fiction from Syracuse University and a PhD in English from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and has been a fellow at the New York Public Library’s Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers as well as a Fulbright Grantee to Finland. She teaches in the English department and MFA program at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and serves as editor of Witness magazine.

Elizabeth A.I. Powell 

Elizabeth A.I. Powell

Thursday, April 6, Flagler Room, Ponce Hall, 7 p.m.   

Elizabeth A.I. Powell is the author of "The Republic of Self" a New Issue First Book Prize winner, selected by C.K. Williams. Her second book of poems, “Willy Loman’s Reckless Daughter: Living Truthfully Under Imaginary Circumstances” won the 2015 Anhinga Robert Dana Prize, selected by Maureen Seaton. Her poetry has appeared in the Pushcart Prize Anthology 2013Alaska Quarterly ReviewBarrow StreetEcotoneHarvard ReviewIndiana ReviewMissouri ReviewMississippi ReviewSlopeSugarhouse ReviewPloughsharesPost RoadZocalo Public Square, and elsewhere. She is Editor of Green Mountains Review, and Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Johnson State College. She also serves on the faculty of the low-residency MFA in Creative Writing at the University of Nebraska-Omaha and the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing and Publishing. She lives in Vermont.

 

Marvin Dunn

Marvin Dunn

Thursday, February 9th, Solarium, Ponce Hall, 7 p.m.

 Dr. Marvin Dunn will discuss his new book, A History of Florida: Through Black Eyes.  Dr. Dunn taught in the Department of Psychology at Florida International University for thirty-four years, retiring as chairman of the department in 2006. He earned his Ph. D in psychology from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. His books include The Miami Riot of 1980: Crossing the Bounds, co-authored with Bruce Porter, Black Miami in the Twentieth Century (1997) and “The Beast in Florida: A History of Anti-Black Violence (2012). He has directed three documentary films, Black Seminoles in the Bahamas: The Red Bays Story, Murder on the Suwannee River: The Willie James Howard Story and Rosewood Uncovered.  His latest book, A History of Florida: Through Black Eyes, was published in 2016.