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Latino Amerians: 500 Years of History
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Latino Americans: 500 Years of History

Flagler College has been selected to receive a competitive Latino Americans: 500 Years of History grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the American Library Association (ALA) to hold public programming about Latino history and culture.

The College will host scholar talks, and screen and facilitate discussions of the NEH-supported documentary film “Latino Americans,” created for PBS in 2013—an award-winning series chronicling the history of Latinos in the United States from the 16th century to present day. (Learn more about the series at www.pbs.org/latino-americans/en/.)

In addition, the College will reach out to the Latino American community in St. Johns County to collect oral histories, photos, and memorabilia for digital preservation and exhibition.

Event Schedule

Spring 2016

Wednesday, Feb. 17

7 p.m.
Location: Solarium
Efrain Barradas lecture, “What is Latino Art?: A Simple Question and a Complex Reality”

Using as basis for the discussion about the nature and character of Latino art two important exhibitions organized by the Smithsonian Museum of American Art (2001 and 2013), this talk will try to explain why an apparently simple work of art can point to a very complex social and cultural reality.  A possible definition of Latino art represents an excellent point of departure for the discussion of Latino culture and history in general.  Works of art included in these two exhibitions will be used as starting point of this discussion about the large question of the nature of Latino culture. Efrain Barradas is Professor at the University of Florida. 
 

Wednesday, February 24

6 p.m.
Location: Proctor Library 200
Screening of Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, Episode 5: Prejudice and Pride with scholar-led discussion by Maria Jose Maguire, Assistant Professor of Spanish.

This episode explores the 1960s and 1970s generation of Mexican Americans who, frustrated by persistent discrimination and poverty, found a new way forward, through social action and the building of a new “Chicano” identity. The movement ignited when farm workers in the fields of California, led by César Chavez and Dolores Huerta, marched on Sacramento for equal pay and humane working conditions.

During these decades, plays, poetry, and film, created a new appreciation of the long history of Mexicans in the South West and the Mestizo roots of Mexican Americans; the largest high school student walkout in American history demanded Chicano students be given the same educational opportunities as Anglos; and activists created a new political party and changed the rules of the electoral game.

By the end of the 1970s Chicano activism and identity had transformed what it meant to be an American. Chicano and Latino studies were incorporated into school curriculum and Latinos were included in the political process.

Tuesday, March 1

12:30 pm
Location: St. Johns County Public Library, Main Branch
Screening of Episode 2: Empire of Dreams (1880-1942), Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, with discussion by Kelly Enright, Director of Public History, Flagler College.

Tuesday, March 8

2pm
St. Johns County Public Library, Main Branch
Based on the Book Cinema series screening of Bless Me, Ultima

Tuesday, March 15

12:30 pm
Location: St. Johns County Public Library, Main Branch
Screening of Episode 3: War and Peace (1942-1954), Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, with discussion by Kelly Enright, Director of Public History, Flagler College

Tuesday, March 22

2pm
St. Johns County Public Library, Main Branch
Special Book Club Discussion of Bless Me, Ultima

Tuesday, March 29

12:30 pm
Location: St. Johns County Public Library, Main Branch
Screening of Episode 4: The New Latinos (1946-1965), Latino Americans: 500 Years of History, with discussion by Kelly Enright, Director of Public History, Flagler College

Past Events

Fall 2015

Friday, October 2
4 p.m.
Crisp-Ellert Art Museum
Edgar Endress talk, “Finding Baroque” exhibit opening

Monday, October 5
10a.m. - 12:30p.m.
Flagler College West Lawn
Hispanic Heritage Festival

Sunday, October 11
5p.m.
Lewis Auditorium
Eusebio Leal, Havana historian, preservationist

Thursday, November 12
7p.m.
Crisp-Ellert Art Museum
Screening of Episode 1 of Latino Americans: 500 Years of History with scholar-led discussion by Lori Lee

American Library Association National Endowment for the Humanities St. Johns County Public Library System National Park Service


The Latino Americans: 500 Years of History grantees represent 42 states and the District of Columbia, and include 78 public libraries, 68 college/university libraries and organizations, 19 community college libraries, 10 state humanities councils, 12 museums and a range of other nonprofit organizations. View a full list of the recipients.
Latino Americans: 500 Years of History is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at www.neh.gov.

About the American Library Association

The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 58,000 members in academic, public, school, government and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.


Share Your History

Flagler College, the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, and the St. Johns County Public Library will present and collect histories of Latino Americans in our community, with support from National Endowment of the Humanities and the American Library Association. Do you have a  story to tell? Participate in our events, share your photos, or tell your story for preservation in our digital archive.

Flagler College, el Monumento Nacional de Castillo de San Marcos, y la biblioteca pública del condado de St. Johns, trabajan juntos para presentarle la historia y herencia latinoamericana. Visite nuestra página Web para eventos y actividades en el campus y la comunidad. ¿Compartiría su historia con nosotros? Participe en el diálogo de nuestros eventos y ayúdenos a recolectar fotos e historias orales de la comunidad o díganos su propia historia para nuestros archivos.

For more information, contact:
Para más informaciones, contacte:

Kelly Enright, PhD, Director of Public History

Maria Jose Maguire, Assistant Professor of Spanish

Lori Lee, PhD, Assistant Professor of Anthropology