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Learning Communities

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Your Community of Learning Begins…

Learning Communities

A core element of the Flagler College First Year Experience, Learning Communities are clusters of courses designed around a particular theme, cultural issue, or topic. Typically satisfying general education requirements for first year students, these interdisciplinary classes are deliberately designed to connect you with our finest faculty and to provide you with a learning environment that is both challenging and supportive.

The Learning Communities are grouped according to whether they contain courses that are designated as Writing Intensive or non-Writing Intensive. SAT and ACT scores in English and Writing determine from which group students will select their Learning Community.

Professor and students having class on the West Lawn

  • LC - Non-Writing Intensive
  • LC - Writing Intensive

Non-Writing Intensive Learning Communities courses and are designed for students whose placement scores in English or Writing are below 490 for SAT or 20 for ACT, the required minimum scores for placement in ENG 152.

Fall 2014

Non-Writing Intensive Learning Communities

* These Learning Communities do not contain Writing Intensive courses and are designed for students whose placement scores in English or Writing are below the required scores for placement in ENG 152.

1. Thinking, Planning, and Acting: College Writing and Studying with Purpose*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 090C: TR 9:30-10:45 – Basic Writing with Lab – Leslie Thornhill

No General Education Requirements Met

REA 090F: TR 11-12:15 – Study Skills for College Success – Jay Szczepanski

No General Education Requirements Met

Description/Rationale:

This learning community integrates ENG090 and REA090 studies with collaborative assignments designed to reflect and enhance learning comprehension by incorporating effective critical thinking skills through studying, listening, communicating, reading, and writing.

2. Strategies for Success through Writing*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 090A: MW 2-3:15 – Basic Writing – Pamela Teper

No General Education Requirements Met

REA 090D: MW 5-6:15 – Study Skills for College Success – Yvette-Marie Harbison

No General Education Requirements Met

Description/Rationale:

This learning community is designed to accelerate and enhance the students' academic experience and success. During the term, ENG 090 - Basic Writing will work on collaborative and integrative assignments with REA 090 - Study Skills for College Success. These assignments will reflect and enhance comprehension of academic learning by integrating effective critical thinking skills through listening, communicating, reading, and writing collaborative assignments.

3. Reading to Write and Writing to Read: Exploring the Process in First-year Composition*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 142B: MWF 12-12:50 – Intro to College Writing – Kim Bradley

No General Education Requirements Met

REA 142B: TR 12:30-1:45 – College Reading with Lab – Sally McGhee

No General Education Requirements Met

Description/Rationale:

Reading and writing lead to understanding, and just as you can discover how to read through writing, so too can you become more aware of the details of the writing process through reading.

4. Word Craft: The Power and Promise of Communication I*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 142F: TR 2-3:15 – Intro to College Writing – Connie St. Clair-Andrews

No General Education Requirements Met

COM 101G: TR 3:30-4:45 – Speech Communication – Don Aycock

Flagler Core Experience; c. Speech Communication

Description/Rationale:

This learning community combines one section of ENG 142 Introduction to College Writing with one section of COM 101 Speech Communication. Students will actively engage in the written and oral communication process. They will explore and practice techniques and strategies of invention, discovery, observation, organization, style, and delivery. These activities help students to use the effective power of language to obtain their goals. Hands-on assignments will include determining how the use of language reveals identity, exchanges information, and persuades a target audience. Spoken, written, and visual texts will be analyzed and created through a series of essays and speeches. Everyone communicates. Why not learn to do it well?

5. Word Craft: The Power and Promise of Communication II*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 142G: TR 3:30-4:45 – Intro to College Writing – Connie St. Clair-Andrews

No General Education Requirements Met

COM 101F: TR 2-3:15 – Speech Communication – Don Aycock

Flagler Core Experience; c. Speech Communication

Description/Rationale:

This learning community combines one section of ENG 142 Introduction to College Writing with one section of COM 101 Speech Communication. Students will actively engage in the written and oral communication process. They will explore and practice techniques and strategies of invention, discovery, observation, organization, style, and delivery. These activities help students to use the effective power of language to obtain their goals. Hands-on assignments will include determining how the use of language reveals identity, exchanges information, and persuades a target audience. Spoken, written, and visual texts will be analyzed and created through a series of essays and speeches. Everyone communicates. Why not learn to do it well?

6. Motivation and Writing*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 142C: MW 2-3:15 – Introduction to College Writing w/ Lab – Karina Cadora

No General Education Requirements Met

PSY 101G: MWF 8-8:50 – Introduction to Psychology – Robert Cantu

IV. Ways of Knowing a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

Facilitate students' understanding of themselves through the study of psychology and writing. Students learn how to improve their writing skills by analysis of their behavior.

7. Sound and Self: Exploring Connections between Music and Personality*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

MUS 101B: TR 12:30-1:45 – Music Appreciation – Raphael Saliba

III. Creative Expression; a. Creative Aesthetics

PSY 210A: TR 2-3:15 – Psychology of Personality – Stephen Willard

No General Education Requirements Met

Description/Rationale:

Music is a uniquely human communication from one "psyche" (variously translated as "mind", "soul", or "self") to another; and the relationship between music and psychology has long been an enticing subject for exploration by philosophers, psychologists, musicologists, and others. People are inherently interested in themselves, their personalities, and their favorite activities and pleasures, such as listening to music. Students in this learning community, which pairs a course in music appreciation with a course in the psychology of personality, will examine some of the fascinating interconnections between personality and musical perceptions and preferences.

8. Motivation and Writing*

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 142: MWF 1-1:50 – Introduction to College Writing w/ Lab – TBA

No General Education Requirements Met

PSY 101G: TR 9:30-10:45– Introduction to Psychology – Ryan Darby

IV. Ways of Knowing a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

Facilitate students' understanding of themselves through the study of psychology and writing. Students learn how to improve their writing skills by analysis of their behavior.


** Although these courses are non-Writing Intensive, students enrolling in these Learning Communities must have a minimum of 500 SAT or 21 ACT on their Math placement scores.


10. The Yin and Yang of Mathematics I**

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

MAT 223D: MWF 8:8:50 – Statistics – Don Robbins

I. Flagler Core Experience; a. Mathematics, Sub-Category B

MAT 135C: MWF 9-9:50 – College Algebra – Greg Smith

I. Flagler Core Experience; a. Mathematics, Sub-Category A

Description/Rationale:

Einstein believed that the universe should be predictable through physical laws rather than being somewhat random. This Learning Community cluster will compare and contrast models which describe relationships that can be determined precisely and those models that have a random component. Students will also satisfy all General Education mathematics requirements in one semester…one and done!

"God does not play dice with the universe" – Albert Einstein

11. The Yin and Yang of Mathematics II**

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

MAT 223E: MWF 9-9:50 – Statistics – Don Robbins

I. Flagler Core Experience; a. Mathematics, Sub-Category B

MAT 135D: MWF 10-10:50 – College Algebra – Greg Smith

I. Flagler Core Experience; a. Mathematics, Sub-Category A

Description/Rationale:

Einstein believed that the universe should be predictable through physical laws rather than being somewhat random. This Learning Community cluster will compare and contrast models which describe relationships that can be determined precisely and those models that have a random component. Students will also satisfy all General Education mathematics requirements in one semester…one and done!

"God does not play dice with the universe" – Albert Einstein

Fall 2014

Writing Intensive Learning Communities

These Learning Communities, numbered 20 and up, contain one or more Writing Intensive courses. Students must be eligible for ENG 152 or 172 in order to select a Learning Community from this group. Writing Intensive courses are designated by “WI” in the course code following the three digit number. The letter for the course section appears at the end of the course code.

20. Visual Sociology

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ART 218WI(Writing Intensive)C(course section): MWF 11-11:50 – Visual Culture – Chris Balaschack

III. Creative Expression; a. Creative Aesthetics (Gen Ed requirement met)

SOC 101WIF: TR 3:30-4:45 – Introduction to Sociology – Amod Pyakuryal

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community examines the intersection of artistic media and the study of society, and in particular how visual aspects, and representations of society can affect attitudes and perceptions of others. Methods and movements in the disciplines of Sociology, Art History, and Visual Studies are discussed and students are encouraged to develop a critical awareness of the place of visual arts and media within human society.

21. Who am I? Opportunities for Self-Understanding in Psychology and Literature

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

PSY 101A: MWF 10-10:50 – Introduction to Psychology – Emily Splane

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

ENG 152WIO: TR 9:30-10:45 – Research Topics in College Writing – Sally McGhee

I. Flagler Core Experience; b. English Composition

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community will facilitate students’ understanding of themselves through the study of psychology and literature. Students make connections between the major theories, perspectives, and individual contributors in the field of modern psychology and the elements of literature in short stories, poems, and essays to create thematic topics for the writing process, ultimately exploring and revealing what it means to be human.

22. Fault Lines in Religion

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

POS 200WID: MWF 11-11:50 – Introduction to Political Science – Will Miller

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

REL 211B: MWF 10-10:50 – World Religion – Jim Rowell

II. Foundations of Knowledge; b. Studies of Culture

Description/Rationale:

In this learning community, we do what the American government is explicitly told not to and tear down the wall separating church and state. Over the course of the semester, we will examine the interplay between religion and politics across the globe and work to determine historical, political, and philosophical causes for how religion impacts government in different settings. A focus of our study will be on the political and religious divisions between Israel/Palestine and India/Pakistan.

23. Creating America: Culture and Identity in American History and Politics

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

POS 221WIA: TR 9:30-10:45 – Politics in the United States – Rachel Cremona

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

HIS 205WIA: TR 11-12:15 – United States History to 1877 – Leslee Keys

II. Foundations of Knowledge; a. Western History

Description/Rationale:

: From the time of first contact forward, culture and identity have been fundamental to the understanding of what it means to be an American. This course will explore the historical and political contexts that have shaped and been shaped by both the intersection and integration of cultures.

24. Constructing Identity

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ART 218WIA: MWF 11-11:50 – Visual Culture – Chris Smith

III. Creative Expression; a. Creative Aesthetics

CRW 206WIF: MWF 10-10:50 – Intro to Short Story Writing – Jim Wilson

III. Creative Expression; b. Creative Production

Description/Rationale:

This cluster will focus on Identity — how people, literary characters, corporations, and societies create, manipulate, and transform their own identities. These courses will incorporate studying and creating artistic and literary pieces focused on advertising, writing, photography, and video. Through this journey into identity, both yours and others, we hope that you will move toward understanding your own identity with more clarity as well as understanding identities being expressed in culture, society, and in the corporate world.

25. Honorable Politics and Entrepreneurship in America

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

POS 200WIA: MWF 9-9:50 – Intro to Politics – Brenda Kauffman

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

ENT 201A: MWF 10-10:50 – Foundations of Honorable Entrepreneurship – Felix Livingston

No General Education Requirements Met

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community provides a cultural, historical, philosophical and social scientific overview of the concept and importance of honor in politics and business. Ideas from the humanities and the social sciences from across the centuries are explored and connected to the evolution of American social life. By examining the words and ideas of poets, writers, historians and philosophers who have written about intellectual and social forces that have influenced development of America's political economy we will see that contemporary challenges affecting business and government have deep roots.

26. Literature, Art, and Film between the Wars

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ART 218WIB: MWF 1-1:50 – Visual Culture – Catherine McFarland

III. Creative Expression; a. Creative Aesthetics

ENG 152WIJ: MWF 2-2:50 – Research Topics in College Writing – Douglas McFarland

I. Flagler Core Experience; b. English Composition

Description/Rationale:

This course will explore the cultural responses of Europeans to the horrors of World War I, the extreme economic upheavals, and the rapid technological change that occurred between 1914 and 1939. Our topics for the visual arts will include German Expressionist art and cinema, the Dada movement, Surrealism, the “Call to Order”, and “le Jazz Hot”. We will also look at propaganda films and posters from the Russian Revolution and the Spanish Civil War. Literary works may include those by Proust, Joyce, Freud, and Musil.

27. The Role of Transgression in the Development of a Meaningful Life

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

PHI 103WIB: MWF 11-11:50 – Introduction to Philosophy I – Hugh Marlowe

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

ENG 211WIA: MWF 12-12:50 – Introduction to British Literature I – Tamara Wilson

III. Creative Expression; a. Creative Aesthetics

Description/Rationale:

Drs. Marlowe and Wilson are intrigued by the challenges for, and opportunities presented to, individuals as they encounter, or perform, transgressions in their pursuit of an authentic life. These challenges are intertwined by desires, virtues and vices. These are fundamental entanglements upon which many thinkers have pondered and offered their thoughts. By pairing the philosophic writings of such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, and Nietzsche with works of Early British literature such as Beowulf, Measure for Measure, and Pope’s “Essay on Man,” students will have an opportunity to engage in the vigorous discussion between Philosophy and Literature, working towards determining their place in our bewilderingly multi-faceted culture. While class discussion is an essential component of this cluster (a Writing Intensive cluster in the General Education program), a substantial amount of writing is required on a regular basis. Writing assignments include: the integrated assignment (30% of the grade for both classes), shorter out of class essays, essays required for exams and, in ENG 211, an on-going reading log, in which individual ponderings and epiphanies are documented.

28. Crime & Punishment in Film

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

POS 200WIB: 11-11:50 – Introduction to Political Science – Rachel Cremona

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

ENG 152WIE: 10-10:50 – Research Topics in College Writing – Wesley King

I. Flagler Core Experience; b. English Composition

Description/Rationale:

In this course, we will be examining political theories of criminality, law, and justice and the application of these theories to the study of films. Subtopics of the course include: criminality and identity (race, class and gender), the death penalty, discipline and punishment through the authority of the state, issues of law and criminality in international contexts. The Learning Community will enable students to become more effective writers.

29. Executing Justice: Capital Punishment in America. Is Death Different?

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

SOC 240A: M 5-7:30 – Sociology of Criminal Law – Alison DeBelder

No General Education Requirements Met

POS/LAW 355WIB: MW 3:30-4:45 – Ethical Issues in the Judiciary – Lewis Buzzell

No General Education Requirements Met

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community will provide students with a solid foundation in the way that the U.S. legal system has developed and how it functions. There will be a particular emphasis upon the criminal justice system, the death penalty, and application of the death penalty in Florida since 1972. This offering will develop students’ understanding of notions of justice, criminality, and punishment with focused contemplation upon capital punishment, especially as imposed in the modern United States.

30. The XX Factor: Exploring the Role of Gender from the Inside Out

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 152 WI: MWF 12-12:50 – Research Topics in College Writing – Judith Burdan
I. Flagler Core Experience; b. English Composition

ENG 242 WI: MWF 11-11:50 –Unfolding the Complexities of Gender– Alex Asbille
III. Creative Expression; a. Creative Aesthetics

 

 

"I came to explore the wreck.

The words are purposes.

The words are maps.

I came to see the damage that was done

and the treasures that prevail.

Adrienne Rich, “Diving into the Wreck”

 

This Learning Community is designed to provide an introduction to some of the gender issues that affect each of us personally, socially, culturally, economically, and politically. We will explore the origins of our current views of gender, consider gender as a social construct, and learn about feminism and feminist analysis, its history and its current status. We will also look at the ways that gender influences families, work, law, popular culture, and self-image. We will work from the inside out, from private concerns to public issues. We will move from personal writing and reflection to research, argument, and analysis. To do this, we will study diverse texts, such as literature, film, advertising, and social media as well as feminist scholarship. This Learning Community will also seek to place our academic exploration within a real world context through guest speakers, volunteer opportunities, and field trips.

31. Shifting Tides: The science and history of the American Environment

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

NAS 107E: TR 2-2:50, W 10-11:50 – Environmental Science w/ lab – Ed McGinley

IV. Ways of Knowing Category; b. Natural Scientific Inquiry

HIS 205WIC: TR 12:30-1:45 – US History to 1877 – Kelly Enright

II. Foundations of Knowledge; a. Western History

Description/Rationale:

Pairing the U.S. history survey from origins through Reconstruction with Environmental Science, this Learning Community examines the ways in which the environment has shaped the past—and how humans have shaped the environment. Using episodes from American history, we explore the science of environmental change, as well as the social, cultural, and political changes that have shaped the landscape and its people. These relationships have defined how our population has grown, how we use natural resources, and how perspectives of nature have changed. What impact have these issues had on the environment of the past and how they are still affecting our daily lives? Using St. Augustine as a classroom and laboratory, we will investigate changes in our own surroundings and seek to understand the historical and environmental consequences of such change. An Environmental Science lab section is included in this cluster.

32. Imaging America: U.S. History Through the Lens of Media

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

COM 208G: MW 2-3:15 – Introduction to Media – Mark Huelsbeck

III. Creative Expression; a. Creative Aesthetics

HIS 206WIE: TR 3:30-4:45 – US History since 1877 – Donny Brazile

II. Foundations of Knowledge; a. Western History

Description/Rationale:

Any cultural history of the media must essentially reconstruct the character of the times. Conversely, the history of any culture will be reflected in all the diverse forms that the media may assume. This learning community will explore these connections. By viewing movies and television, listening to radio shows and documentaries, reading newspapers and social media — by all these means we will learn in context what was the US experience from 1877 to the present.

33. May the Odds Be Ever in Your Favor: The Hunger Games

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

PHI 103WID: MWF 1-1:50 – Introduction to Philosophy – Douglas Keaton

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

POS 200WIE: MWF 2-2:50 – Introduction to Political Science – Will Miller

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

In this learning community we use The Hunger Games trilogy as a doorway into explorations in philosophy and political science. Some questions we will ask: What makes a person a good person? What is the nature of tyranny? When do circumstances make it OK to kill an innocent? When is revolution justified? How do the media affect us? By examining both the texts and films, we will demonstrate how the underlying themes of The Hunger Games go beyond simple literary value.

34. To Stimulate or Not to Stimulate: The Role of Government in a Global Economy

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

INT 200WIA: MWF 11-11:50 – Introduction to International studies – Brenda Kauffman

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

ECO 201D: MWF 12-12:50 – Principles of Macroeconomics – Mike Sandberg

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community provides students with an interdisciplinary view of the U.S. economy and how it relates to the overall global economy. We are living in an increasingly globalized environment and national economies are more interdependent than ever before. Given this interdependence, events in one economy usually have ripple effects throughout the world. Economic phenomena, such as the global financial crisis of 2008-2010, often trigger policy responses. Much debate over economic policy, may it be in Washington D.C., London, Beijing, or Tokyo, centers around the appropriate role of government in the economy. In this Learning Community, students will learn to analyze the motivations behind economic policies and they will critically evaluate their effects, domestically as well as internationally. Ultimately, this course serves to make students better global citizens by integrating the principles of economics, politics, international relations, history, and geography into a coherent narrative about the global economy and the linkages that exist among countries.

35. The Global Commons

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

INT 200WIC: TR 12:30-1:45 – Intro to International Studies – Art Vanden Houten

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

NAS 107F: M 12-1:50, TR 11-11:50 – Environmental Science w/ lab – Melissa Southwell

IV. Ways of Knowing; b. Natural Science Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

The classic 1968 essay “The Tragedy of the Commons” illustrates the challenges of managing shared resources among individual stakeholders. This learning community explores the implications of this principle in the international sphere. How do sovereign nations handle issues like water rights, pollution, and wildlife protection given that wind, water, and animals refuse to respect national boundaries? We will investigate the international conflicts surrounding the most urgent environmental issues of today, with special emphasis placed on the role of China and its rapidly growing political and economic influence.

36. The Rise of the West & Globalization

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

HIS 102WID: MWF 1-1:50 – Western Civilization II – Wayne Riggs

II. Foundations of Knowledge; a. Western History

ENG 152WIR: TR 11-12:15 – Research Topics in College Writing – Craig Woelfel

I. Flagler Core Experience; b. English Composition

INT 200WIB: MW 2-3:15 – International Studies – Art Vanden Houten

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community integrates two foundational classes from separate but complementary fields (Western Civ II and International Relations) with Research Topics in College Writing, allowing students to earn 9 credit hours. The integrated course gives students an opportunity to study key developments in modern western history in the broad context of International Studies. Since Western Civilization II offers an extensive sweep of history from the 18th century to the present, and International Studies stresses an interdisciplinary approach to the study of world events, students will gain a deeper understanding of the interrelated nature of many major world events. Furthermore, they will develop a greater appreciation for how western culture has shaped, and been shaped, by other civilizations.

37. The Entertainment Industry

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ECO 201G: TR 9:30-10:45 – Principles of Macroeconomics – Yvan Kelly

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

ENG 152WIY: TR 11-12:15 – Research Topics in College Writing – Allan Marcil

I. Flagler Core Experience; b. English Composition

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community will integrate the fundamentals of college writing with the principles of economics under the theme of the entertainment business. The courses will explore film, TV, music, and the dynamics of turning creativity into a profitable business endeavor while analyzing the inherent tensions between art and commerce.

38. "Through The Eyes of ..."

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

HIS 205WIE: MWF 10-10:50 – U.S. History To 1877 – Steve Voguit

II. Foundations of Knowledge; a. Western History

THA 105B: MWF 9-9:50 – Acting for the Non-Major – Christine Fogarty

III. Creative Expression; b. Creative Production

Description/Rationale:

This Learning Community will examine the various figures of the first half of American History and their distinctive personalities and characteristics. Dramatic portrayals of historical characters and moments along with observations of professional productions will be featured in the class.

39. Athens Jerusalem Rome

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

POS 203WIB: TR 8-9:15 – Introduction to Political Thought – Art Vanden Houten

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

REL 101A: TR 9:30-10:45 – Introduction to Old Testament – Tim Johnson

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

The peoples of Israel and Ancient Greece have left a deep religious, political and philosophical legacy for Western Civilization. Both peoples struggled mightily with some of the gravest questions that face any society: What is God? What is justice? What is the nature of the good life? What is community, and what does it mean to be a member of a particular community. By confronting original texts from the ancient world, for example, the epic of Gilgamesh, the Old Testament, Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Politics and Augustine’s City of God, this cluster examines many of the profound and enduring answers the people of Greece and Israel offered as they grappled with these timeless questions. As such, the cluster asks students to reflect on some of the deepest questions and yearnings animating the human experience.

40. Motives and Morality

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ECO 202WIB: MWF 11-11:50 – Principles of Microeconomics – Roger Bradley

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

HIS 101C: TR 11-12:15 – Western Civilization I – John Young

II. Foundations of Knowledge; a. Western History

Description/Rationale:

This learning community will integrate the early history of western civilization and microeconomics by 1) exposing students to basic microeconomic principles through historical example, and 2) asking students to examine and evaluate the historical record through the application of these economic principles. The course will be organized into four segments, each of which focuses on a major historical event. For each segment, students will read original source material pertaining to that event, and attempt to evaluate the motives and moral perspective of the individuals involved in that event. This evaluation will focus primarily on economic motives, and students will be given the opportunity to develop reasoned and evidence-based opinions about the moral quality of the motives involved.

41. Lawyers and Logic Games

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

LAW 355WIA: TR 2-3:15 – American Constitutional Issues – Chris Moser

No General Education Requirements Met

PHI 223B: TR 12:30-1:45 – Logic-Critical Thinking – Doug Keaton

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

Is the death penalty moral or immoral? When should abortion be legal? Is attempted robbery a less serious crime than successful robbery? We all have ethical “gut reactions” about questions such as these. But are our gut reactions rational? How can we argue about them? Should the law take our ethical reactions into account? How? In this learning community we will investigate ethics and reason with a special focus on the American legal system. We study important legal issues and the arguments that lawyers and judges have made about them. In the Logic half of the learning community, we will study the foundations of valid reasoning. In the Pre-Law half of the learning community, we will study the ethical foundations of the American legal system. We learn how to construct and evaluate arguments. We learn how to write clear, brief, and correct explanations of complex legal and ethical arguments. We will become better thinkers by thinking about the law, about ethics, and about thinking itself. We learn more about the laws that we live under every day, and what the rational basis for them might – or might not – be.

42. Divergent Insurgents in Educational Environments

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

PSY 101C: MWF 9-9:50 – Introduction to Psychology – Jeremy Krause

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

EDU 202WIA: MWF 8-8:50 – Introduction to Teaching and Learning – Sally Blake

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

This community will investigate the intersection between psychology and education, including how developmental factors, behavioral practices and environment influence perceptions of the educational environment and learning. Students will work in investigative teams to explore questions and issues related to psychological principles and practices in education; promoting the development of observational and research skills through the analysis of teaching and learning practices within the classroom and in other educational settings. Outcomes will include participation in an on-campus conference style poster session where students will have the opportunity to present their findings to one another and the broader campus community.

43. When Public Opinion and the Courts Collide: The Intersection of Law and Politics

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

POS221 WI: TR 8-9:15 – Politics in the United States– Will Miller

IV. Ways of Knowing a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

POS 200 WI: TR 9-10:45 – Introduction to Political Science – Jill Miller

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

Watching or reading the news in America today demonstrates that quite often the court of public opinion and the American judicial system do not agree on issues of legality. In this Learning Community, we will introduce students to American government and law through a focused study of the Constitution and court cases. Much time will be devoted to examining cases where politics, public opinion, and the law collide, including those related to abortion, campaign finance, gay marriage, and religious freedoms. Driving the course will be the question of, “What happens when what seems right is legally wrong?”

44. The Pleasures and Perils of Democracy

Courses, Instructors and General Education information:

ENG 152 WI: MWF 1-1:50 – Research Topics in College Writing – Will Pewitt

I. Flagler Core Experience; b. English Composition

POS 200 WI: MWF 12-12:50 – Introduction to Political Science – Jill Miller

IV. Ways of Knowing; a. Social, Behavioral, and Philosophical Inquiry

Description/Rationale:

This course will explore major readings in political science, history, philosophy and religion as well as methods of analysis and composition.

 

General Education Curriculum

Students are required to complete specific groups of courses from a variety of fields to ensure exposure to different ideas and ways of thinking. General education courses are typically taken during your freshman and sophomore years. Check out the General Education checklist as well as your course catalog for more details.