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Learning Communities

Your Community of Learning Begins…

Learning Communities Spring 2018

A core element of the Flagler College First Year Experience, Learning Communities are clusters of courses designed around a particular theme, cultural issue, or topic. Typically satisfying general education requirements for first year students, these interdisciplinary classes are deliberately designed to connect you with our finest faculty and to provide you with a learning environment that is both challenging and supportive.

Spring 2018 Courses

Listed below are the Learning Communities for the Spring 2018 semester:

  • LC #1- Through Our Stories We Create Our History

    Students will examine the various figures of the first half of American history, their distinctive personalities and characteristics. Dramatic portrayals of historical characters will be featured in a final presentation.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Steve VoguitHIS 206MWF 8:00-8:50
    Christine FogartyTHA 105TR 12:30-1:45
  • LC #2- Acting Out the Past

    To restore the past the options it once had is the best any history can do. This Learning Community examines American characters, their lives and times since 1877 and facilitates a greater analysis of empathy and the range of the American experience through role-playing. By embodying techniques used by actors, the student may gain a keener awareness of how history was shaped then and how that understanding of the past can inform the present as well as the future.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Donny BrazileHIS 206TR 8:00-9:15
    Christine FogartyTHA 105TR 11:00-12:15
  • LC #3- Imaging America

    Any cultural history of the media must essentially reconstruct the character of the times. Conversely, the history of any culture will be reflected in all the diverse forms that the media may assume. This Learning Community will explore the connections between history and multiple forms of media. By viewing movies and television, listening to radio shows and documentaries, reading newspapers and social media. The Learning Community will learn in context the US experience from 1877 to present and beyond.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jane CliffordCOM 208TR 2:00-3:15
    Donny BrazileHIS 206TR 12:30-1:45
  • LC #4- Farm to Factory to Freedom

    Education is not preparation for life; it is life itself. This Learning Community explores the history of education in the United States by examining historical and societal forces, and the role of education, in forging an American identity. The Learning Community will additionally focus on behavioral and cognitive learning theories and explore recent research to recognize the importance of emotional and social intelligence as well as academic ability. The role of government, teachers, and students in forming a more educated and just society will also be explored.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Michella Maiorana-BasasEDU 202MWF 9:00-9:50
    Donny BrazileHIS 206MWF 10:00-10:50
  • LC #5- Lived Perspectives: The Saint, Outcast, Survivor, and Reformer

    Combining World Religions and Oral Interpretation of Literature, this Learning Community explores the lives of four individuals whose faiths influenced their lives and the world. Students will create performances from selections of prose and poetry which reflect each individual's life. The semester will culminate in a showcase of performances from the semester.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Christine FogartyTHA105TR 9:30-10:45
    James RowellREL 111TR 11:00-12:15
  • LC #6- Lawyers and Logic Games

    "We combine an introductory class in Law with an introductory class in Logic to teach students the skills of critical thinking and legal argument. This is the ideal Learning Community to take if you are thinking about a minor in Law, but the skills you’ll learn are invaluable for a college career no matter your major. So whether you are planning a career as a lawyer, or simply wish to understand the American legal system, or even just wish to start your college career off by learning skills that will help in all of your classes, this Learning Community is great choice. We will watch films and discuss current events, as well as study logic puzzles ancient and modern. So bring your thinking cap!

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Douglas KeatonPHI 223MWF 8:00-8:50
    Chris MoserLAW 355MWF 9:00-9:50
  • LC #7- Conflict or Cooperation? Tackling International Environmental Challenges

    We live in a world where population is rapidly increasing but environmental resources are dwindling. In this inescapable reality, is war inevitable? Historically, competition for limited resources has indeed bred conflicts, but just as often it has served as a basis for strengthening international relationships through negotiation and diplomacy. How can nations regulate issues like water rights, pollution, and wildlife protection given that wind, water, and animals refuse to respect national boundaries? In this learning community, we will investigate the international conflicts surrounding the most urgent environmental issues of today, with special emphasis on China and the Middle East. Our goal will be to understand the environmental challenges at work and how nations can find a path toward a peaceful, sustainable future.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Art Vanden HoutenINT200TR 11:00-12:15
    Melissa SouthwellNAS107Class TR 9:30-10:45/Lab F 9:00-10:50
  • LC #8- The Rise of the West and Globalization

    We will cover developments from the sixteenth century to the present, learning about past events, people, ideas and attitudes. The course will be divided into various “historical segments” as we study the changing political, economic, and ideological ideals of western culture, and the ways in which the “west” has defined itself against the rest of the world. Furthermore the events of western history will be examined in the multi-disciplinary context of International Studies, thereby allowing students to engage in methods of political science, sociology, anthropology, etc. Discussions and writing assignments will be based on a variety of primary source readings taken from various epochs in history, read in conjunction with a broad historical narrative of the period. Focused instruction in composition will enable students to conduct academic critical analysis and to learn about, and build a foundation in the practice of, college-level academic writing (i.e., evidenced-based argument).

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Craig WoelfelPOS204TR 12:30-1:45
    Wayne RiggsENG202MWF 11:00-11:50
    Art VandenHoutenHIS102MW 2:00-3:15
  • LC #9- Athens Jerusalem Rome

    The peoples of Israel and Ancient Greece have left a deep religious, political and philosophical legacy for Western Civilization. Both peoples struggled mightily with some of the gravest questions that face any society: What is God? What is justice? What is the nature of the good life? What is community, and what does it mean to be a member of a particular community. By confronting original texts from the ancient world, for example, the epic of Gilgamesh, the Old Testament, Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Politics and Augustine’s City of God, this cluster examines many of the profound and enduring answers the people of Greece and Israel offered as they grappled with these timeless questions. As such, the cluster asks students to reflect on some of the deepest questions and yearnings animating the human experience.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Tim JohnsonREL101TR 9:30-10:45
    Art Vanden HoutenPOS203TR 12:30-1:45
  • LC #10- The American Citizen in Politics and Literature

    The story of citizenship in America is a complex one, comprising a melting pot of tales, made up of oppression, hope, failure, and success. This introduction to American Politics and Literature will explore the changing narrative of citizenship, from the founding to today. Students will encounter a variety of perspectives on, and definitions of, citizenship through narrative, fiction, poetry,and primary sources, seen through the context of American Politics.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jill DawsonPOS221TR 8:00am
    Jeff CryanENG202TR 9:30am
  • LC #11- The American Citizen in Politics and Literature

    The story of citizenship in America is a complex one, comprising a melting pot of tales, made up of oppression, hope, failure, and success. This introduction to American Politics and Literature will explore the changing narrative of citizenship, from the founding to today. Students will encounter a variety of perspectives on, and definitions of, citizenship through narrative, fiction, poetry,and primary sources, seen through the context of American Politics.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jill DawsonPOS221TR 11:00am
    Jeff CryanENG202TR 12:30pm
  • LC #12- It's a Small World After All

    This Learning Community provides students with an interdisciplinary view of the U.S. economy and how it relates to the overall global economy. We are living in an increasingly globalized environment and national economies are more interdependent than ever before. Given this interdependence, events in one economy usually have ripple effects throughout the world. Economic phenomena, such as the global financial crisis of 2008-2010, often trigger policy responses. Much debate over economic policy, may it be in Washington D.C., London, Beijing, or Tokyo, centers around the appropriate role of government in the economy. In this Learning Community, students will learn to analyze the motivations behind economic policies and they will critically evaluate their effects, domestically as well as internationally. Ultimately, this course serves to make students better global citizens by integrating the principles of economics, politics, international relations, history, and geography into a coherent narrative about the global economy and the linkages that exist among countries.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Brenda KauffmanINT200MWF 11:00-11:50
    Blen SolomonECO201MWF 10:00-10:50
  • LC #14- High Water Rising: Science, Literature, and the Environment

    In this Learning Community students will explore the dynamic relationship between humanity and the natural world from several disciplinary perspectives, with special attention to the rising tide of environmental crisis. Along the way, students will be introduced to a variety of environmental topics (e.g., ecosystems and biodiversity; human population growth; land utilization; water quality, use, and management; energy cycles and flow; energy consumption and alternatives; sustainability; and climate change, etc.), conduct their own field research and gather data, read selections from classic works of environmental literature (by authors such as Thoreau, John Muir, Rachel Carson, Edward Abbey, Gary Snyder, Wendell Berry, Annie Dillard, Terry Tempest Williams, et al.), and hone their academic writing skills.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Hadley MozerENG242TR 9:30-10:45
    Ben AtkinsonNAS107Classes on MF 11:00-11:50,
    with lab on W 10:00-11:50
  • LC #15- Exploring International Perspectives

    In our increasingly globalized world, it has become increasingly important for students and professionals to develop both an appreciation for global diversity and the perspectives and skills necessary to participate in intercultural communication. Part of that appreciation and perspective involves coming up with effective methodological approaches to global issues. Yet another part involves gaining knowledge of the histories, political and economic systems, cultures, and social organizations of other parts of the world. This LC will address these problems and will seek to instill these perspectives and skills in its students by combining a methodologies- and topics-based course (Intro to International Studies) with a content driven history course on a part of the world about which most American students have little knowledge (Intro to African History).

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Brenda KauffmanINT200TR 11:00-12:15
    John YoungHIS262TR 12:30-1:45
  • LC #16- Algebraic Adventures in Economics

    This learning community combines two general education courses – MAT 135 College Algebra and ECO 202 Principles of Microeconomics. Because both of these courses must be taken by students majoring in business, accounting, finance, and economics, it is recommended for all majors in these areas. By studying algebra and microeconomics together, students begin to see why many consider economics to be the “Queen” of social sciences; it is the only social science for which the Nobel Memorial Prize is awarded. Algebra simplifies and clarifies complex economic relationships. It can play the same role in economics that cavalry plays in battle in that it adds tone to what otherwise would be an unseemly brawl.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Felix LivingstonECO202MWF 11:00-11:50
    Maggie ByrnsMAT135MWF 10:00-10:50
  • LC #17- The Business of Sport

    Sport, a multi-billion dollar industry, pervades our economy and society. The contemporary sport industry has unique legal, business, and management practices, but shares many commonalities with other industries. As a massive sector of the international entertainment industry, sport provides individuals with careers, stockholders with investment opportunities, and consumers with utility-providing entertainment. This learning community applies microeconomic principles and market analyses to the sport industry and explores career choices in sport management.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Reena AhujaECO202MWF 11:00-11:50
    Anne DeMartiniSPM120MWF 12:00-12:50
  • LC #18- The Hunger Games

    The Hunger Games: In this learning community we will explore Panem and its people from the point of view of Philosophy. We will ask questions such as: Could anything justify a dictatorship like Panem? When is revolution justified? Is Peeta the same person before and after he's been hijacked (and what is a person, anyway)? Does The Hunger Games have a happy ending? We will use the story of the Hunger Games as a jumping off point to explore broader themes, and we will also use the broader themes to deepen our appreciation of The Hunger Games. We will be watching all four movies in this class. For this Learning Community we recommend that if you have not read The Hunger Games that you catch up on it over the break!

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Douglas KeatonPHI 103TR 3:30-4:45
    Wes KingENG202MWF 8:00-8:50
  • LC #19- Hooray for Hollywood

    Perhaps the most popular medium in American culture, film does not only entertain the masses—it educates them as well. This Learning Community examines American film and distinct American stories from early silent films through the turbulent 1960s. By deconstructing and reinterpreting movies and their topical themes, the student may appreciate not only the art form but the era from which the films were made.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Thomas HischakTHA209MW 5:00-6:15
    Donny BrazileHIS206MW 3:00-4:15
  • LC #20- Going Bananas

    History and Economics of Latin America

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Allison RobertsECO201TR 9:30-10:45
    Jessica HowellLAS202TR 11:00-12:15
  • LC #21- Genocide

    NOTE: This is an upper-division Learning Community, not open to first year students.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    John YoungHIS440M 5:00-7:30
    Art Vanden HoutenPOS431R 5:00-7:30
  • LC #22- Shifting Ground: Exploring Change Through Literature and Theater

    How do we handle change? Who do we turn to in moments of strife? Why do so many of us resist change? This learning community will combine literature and theatre to explore the theme of change. We will read memoirs, novels, poems, short stories and plays, while also creating original theatre pieces and performing our own stories of change.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Scott BenyackoENG202MW 5:00-6:15
    Leah PageTHA140TR 9:30-10:45
  • LC #23- Words and Music: Writing About Music

    This Learning Community explores the aesthetic appreciation of music as well as how to convey to others the emotions music evokes in us, the ideas it conveys to us, and the pleasures it gives us. To convey their understanding of both music and writing, students will draw on what they have learned about the appreciation of music and literature, as well as writing techniques, to discuss aspects of this art form. Possible topics include why some music stands the test of time, how music enriches our lives, or what qualities make a piece of music move us. A variety of musical genres--rock, jazz, classical, country, r&b, etc.--may be addressed. We intend to learn--and demonstrate--what writers and musicians can communicate to their audience about human expression.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Kevin MurphyENG202TR 11:00-12:15
    Raphael SalibaMUS101TR 12:30-1:45
  • LC #24- Exploring Identity Through Religion and Literature

    This course addresses the formation of identity (religious, gender, ethnic, sexual) through exploration of contemporary literature around religious themes found across major global religions.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jennifer ThweattREL111MWF 2:00-2:50
    Alex EdwardsENG202MW 5:00-6:15
  • LC #26- Theology and Biology

    How does our knowledge of the natural world around us cohere with our experience of spiritual realities? Are science and religion necessarily competing forms of knowledge and experience of the world? How does our knowledge of the natural world inform our religious systems of belief and practices, and vice versa? How do these contribute to our process of decision making on pressing matters with practical and ethical dimensions, such as those presented by advances in biotechnology?

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jennifer ThweattREL111TR 2:00-3:15
    Ed McGinleyNAS111Class TR 3:30-4:45/Lab
    W 12:000-2:45
  • LC #27- The Great American Novel

    The truth is stranger than fiction—and fiction tells the greatest truth. This Learning Community explores the great works in American Literature as they relate to United States History. By delving into the works themselves, and interpreting what they mean, the student will not only learn literary analysis but also become a better writer and invariably arrive at a deeper, broader understanding of United States history since the late-nineteenth century and the resilience of the American Dream.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Donny BrazileHIS206MWF 1:00-1:50
    Lauren TiveyENG202MWF 2:00-2:50
  • LC #28- Ain't That Just Like a Woman

    WMS101/ENG202

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Judith BurdanENG202TR 2:00-3:15
    Alex AsbilleWMS101TR 3:30-4:45
  • LC #29- Confronting "the Other" in Fiction and Film

    The Learning Community “Confronting ‘the Other’ in Fiction and Film” examines “the Other” as a depiction of the human condition, one in which people view the world through an us versus them perspective. We will explore film and fiction as a means of social commentary in the treatment of “the Other,” examining the dystopian concepts of alienation, oppression, and social Darwinism versus inclusion, empathy, and compassion. Works might include but are not limited to, “The Lottery,” “The Demon Lover,” “After the Cure,” “The Segment,” “The Hollow Men,” The Help, I am Legend, The Purge, The Purge: Anarchy, The Hunger Games, The Book of Eli, Minority Report, The Road, Total Recall, Gattaca, 28 Days, 28 Days Later, Warm Bodies, Mad Max (series), Alien (series), Blade Runner, The Fifth Element, Logan’s Run, Serenity, Hacksaw Ridge, Elysium, and Arrival.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Connie St. ClairENG242TR 11:00-12:15
    Lisa BairdCRW206TR 9:30-10:45
  • LC #30- Confronting "the Other" in Fiction and Film

    The Learning Community “Confronting ‘the Other’ in Fiction and Film” examines “the Other” as a depiction of the human condition, one in which people view the world through an us versus them perspective. We will explore film and fiction as a means of social commentary in the treatment of “the Other,” examining the dystopian concepts of alienation, oppression, and social Darwinism versus inclusion, empathy, and compassion. Works might include but are not limited to, “The Lottery,” “The Demon Lover,” “After the Cure,” “The Segment,” “The Hollow Men,” The Help, I am Legend, The Purge, The Purge: Anarchy, The Hunger Games, The Book of Eli, Minority Report, The Road, Total Recall, Gattaca, 28 Days, 28 Days Later, Warm Bodies, Mad Max (series), Alien (series), Blade Runner, The Fifth Element, Logan’s Run, Serenity, Hacksaw Ridge, Elysium, and Arrival.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Connie St. ClairENG242TR 9:30-10:45
    Lisa BairdCRW206TR 11:00-12:15
  • LC #31- Oh the Drama of It All!

    How all forms of media encompass basic principles of theater, from source material to storytelling and entertainment. A close look at the good, bad and ugly from both sides.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jane CliffordCOM208MWF 1:00-1:50
    Leah PageTHA201MWF 2:00-2:50
  • LC #32- Citizenship by the Numbers

    Engaged citizenship requires effort and engagement. This course, providing an introduction to the American political system and Statistics, will provide students with some of the key tools needed to be informed citizens, active voters, and critical thinkers. Students in this Learning Community will be introduced to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistical analysis and American Politics, and will learn how these concepts are reflected in public opinion polling, Political Science research, and predictive analysis.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jill DawsonPOS221MWF 8:00-8:50
    Kurt SebastianMAT223MWF 9:00-9:50
  • LC #33- History and Baseball By the Numbers

    MAT223/HIS206

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Kurt SebastianMAT223MWF 10:00-10:50
    Steve VoguitHIS206MWF 11:00-11:50
  • LC #34- Money, Markets, and Morality

    The love of money, it is said, is the root of all evil. Whether or not this is true, how governments, businesses, and individuals earn and spend their money raises a host of ethical questions. This learning community pairs BUS 101 (Introduction to Business) and PHI 208 (Ethics) in an effort to confront some of these questions. Possible questions the learning community will discuss include: do businesses have an obligation to pay their employees a minimum wage? Should consumers buy things they don't really need when many in the world lack basic necessities? Should consumers purchase products from companies who engage in ethically suspect practices? Are redistributive taxation policies morally justified? The learning community will introduce students to business and to ethical theory thereby providing them with a background to address questions like these.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Paul SneiderBUS101MW 3:30-4:45
    Justin CapesPHI208MWF 10:00-10:50
  • LC #35- Interview-Based Theatre

    This class will provide an overview of applied theatre and media practices. The class will focus on the principles of storytelling, interview techniques, and playwriting, culminating in a short documentary theatre piece.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Jane CliffordCOM208MWF 11:00-11:50
    Leah PageTHA140TR 2:00-3:15
  • LC #36- Bridging the Gap

    In a diverse world, how we communicate with each other is of utmost importance, perhaps more so than ever in this modern era, and is a conversation worth having. This Learning Community will explore the perspectives of numerous voices in an effort to “bridge the gap” between our different experiences, and narrow the spaces between our (often) polarized viewpoints, as we strive to both express and understand one another. Students will focus on building productive communication skills via listening and speaking, and reading and writing, which will culminate in an end-of-the-semester formal essay and presentation project.

    ProfessorCourse#Course Schedule
    Edwidge BryantESL315TR 9:30-10:45
    Lauren TiveyENG152TR 2:00-3:15

Important Dates

Housing Assignments 
December 15, 2017

Move-in Day
January 5, 2018

Building Your Legacy Orientation
January 5-7, 2018

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