Skip Navigation
English Department
Background
English
Connect with Flagler
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Instagram
Google+

Women's Studies

The Women’s Studies minor at Flagler College is an interdisciplinary program that investigates how our lives are affected by gender, race, class, age, sexuality, religion, gender identity, and nationality.

Program Description

Choosing from a variety of courses spanning departments, disciplines, and ideologies, students will learn the importance of understanding gender and sexuality as elements of wider social and political structures of power, knowledge, experience, culture, intimacy, and labor. The introductory core course (WMS 101) encourages students to develop critical thinking skills and an appreciation for the range of theoretical frameworks and methodologies present in contemporary feminist scholarship. Upper-level courses draw on the humanities, arts, social sciences, and natural sciences to explore the broad range of intellectual questions concerning the construction of women, gender, and sexuality in different social, cultural, political, economic, aesthetic, and historical contexts by combining methods and insights of traditional academic disciplines with innovations in interdisciplinary feminist scholarship. The Women’s Studies minor requires a minimum of 18 hours. 

Minor Requirements

Required Course:

WMS 101—Introduction to Women’s Studies (3)

Choose five from below:

COM 334—Gender, Race, Class, and the Media (3)

COM 335—Television and Contemporary Society (3)

ENG 333—Postcolonial Literature

ENG 354—Women’s Literature

HIS355—Women in American History

PSY 368—Sexual Orientation

REL 423—Medieval Religion and Literature

SOC 210—Marriage and Family

SOC 315—Sex, Class, Race, and Ethnicity

SOC 350—Inequality in America

SOC 355—Social Movements

Pre-approved special topics courses.

English professor James Wilson adds “The Encyclopedia of Epic Films” to his list of publications.

Dr. Hadley Mozer in England

European Romantic Review

Sabbatical research by English professor published in a peer-reviewed scholarly journal

students and teacher at writers conference

Slash Pine Writers Festival

For many writers, the act of writing is a deeply personal experience; and yet, its purpose — more often than not — is to be shared.